OLOID – Christian Zehnder / Gregor Hilbe

OLOID – Christian Zehnder / Gregor Hilbe
Thomas Radlwimmer
Published on Jan 9, 2013
CD Release and Documentary Video (March 2013) of the new OLOID Project by singer Christian Zehnder and percussionist Gregor Hilbe, putting into sound the rhythmic movements of the magic OLOID Sculpture, invented by Paul Schatz in 1929. http://www.paul-schatz.ch http://www.rhythming.net http://new-space-mountain.ch/ http://www.traumton.de http://ideeundklang.ch
Video and Documentary by Thomas Radlwimmer http://radlwimmer.at

Mit Stimme, Schlagwerk und den archaischen Sub-Bässen ihrer hölzerner »Organ Mouth Pipes« umkreisen Christian Zehnder (Stimmhorn, Kraah) und Gregor Hilbe (Tangocrash, Vienna Art Orchestra) das magische Oloid und verbinden in ihrem Klangwerk Roots- mit Avantgarde-Musik zu einem eigenwilligen, singulären Erlebnis fern jeglicher Stilbegriffe.
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INGE R. TITZE : From Aerosmith to Pavarotti — How Humans Sing

INGE R. TITZE : From Aerosmith to Pavarotti — How Humans Sing

From Aerosmith to Pavarotti — How Humans Sing
How Does The Singer’s Voice Produce Those Amazing Sounds?

By Ingo R. Titze

inge titze

Overview
The Human Instrument
Infographic
How Instruments Make Music

Although the human vocal system is small, it manages to create sounds as varied and beautiful as those produced by a variety of musical instruments. The question is: How can singers produce all those remarkable sounds?
All instruments, including our singing voices, have a sound source, a resonator that reinforces (amplifies) the basic sound and a radiator that transmits the sound to listeners. In people, the source is vibrating vocal folds (vocal cords) of the larynx or voice box; the resonator is the sound-boosting airway above the larynx; and the radiator is the opening of the mouth.
The human voice can create an impressive array of sounds because it relies on non-linear feedback by which a small input can result in a disproportionately large output. One of the voice’s more effective nonlinear mechanisms is inertive reactance, whereby singers create special conditions in their vocal tract to amplify sounds generated by the vocal folds.
To better understand the complex phenomena that produce the incredible sounds acclaimed vocalists demonstrate in the following sound clips and elsewhere, take a look at my article—The Human Instrument—in the January issue of Scientific American.
SOUND CLIPS Steven Tyler
Steven Tyler, lead singer of the rock band Aerosmith, is celebrated for his ability to scream tunefully. Here, he produces several interesting vocal effects. Tyler first uses some inharmonic (noise-like) sounds to match the timbre of his voice to percussive instruments. He also demonstrates a “flip” into falsetto register, but later employs a bright vowel on the word “same” to continue his belt-like voice (as in “belt” it out) into a high pitch.

Georgia Brown
Georgia Brown is a Brazilian pop singer who is noted for her wide vocal range (eight octaves) and is thus classified as a full dramatic coloratura soprano. In this example, she is likely using inertive reactance in her vocal tract to reinforce a very high-pitched whistle voice that she creates with her vocal folds. No vowels are heard because the pitch sits above the first two vocal-tract resonances that define (perceptually) what a vowel is.

Rollin Rachele
Rollin Rachele is one of the world’s foremost overtone singers, a technique in which a person vocalizes two notes simultaneously. Overtone singing and related techniques are most widely recognized in the Tuvan, Mongolian and Tibetan cultures. Rachele never uses the fundamental frequency to change pitch. Rather, he maintains the fundamental frequency as a constant drone, then applies varying vocal tract shapes to resonate a single harmonic of this drone at any one time. By skipping from harmonic to harmonic he can play a tune with these high frequencies, also known as overtones.

1 2 Next »

Joan Sutherland
Dame Joan Sutherland, the renowned Australian operatic soprano, knew instinctively that some vowels cannot be used when singing certain pitches. In this case, she uses a less open mouth shape in her middle pitch range than she does in her high pitch range. One vowel, for instance, sounds more like “oh” in the middle and “ah” at the top. Sutherland alternates between an inverted megaphone (horn-like) shape and a megaphone shape in these vowels to reinforce the sonic energy produced at the vocal folds.

Ethel Merman
On stage, Broadway musical star Ethel Merman belted out songs with precise enunciation and pitch so audiences could hear her even without amplification. Here, she uses bright vowels with high first-resonance frequency to make optimal use of inertive reactance. Pay particular attention to the vowels she uses in “everything,” “roses,” “for” and “me.” The vowels all suggest that she employs the horn-like megaphone vocal-tract shape. But unlike Joan Sutherland, Merman uses the megaphone shape in the middle of her pitch range to reinforce the second harmonic. Sutherland, in contrast, makes use of the megaphone shape only on very high notes to reinforce the first harmonic. Neither female vocalist sings true speech-like vowels.

Luciano Pavarotti
Luciano Pavarotti, the recently deceased Italian operatic tenor, is famed for the brilliance and beauty of his tone. In this example, he uses a vocal production in his high notes that is similar to that which Ethel Merman uses in her mid- to high-pitch range. The male high voice has a strong second harmonic as does the female belt voice. But Pavarotti widens his pharynx (the airway above the larynx) more, producing an additional ring in the voice, while downplaying the more typical twanging sound. As far as timbre is concerned, ring sounds match better with bowed string and woodwind instruments, whereas twanging sounds match better with brass and percussion instruments.

Audio file manifest ETHEL MERMAN – Female belt voice
Clip 1: Minutes 1:35 to 1:51
APA style ref: Styne, J., Sondheim, S. (1959). Everything’s Coming Up Roses [Recorded by E. Merman, S. Black, London Festival Orchestra & Chorus]. On Merman Sings Merman [CD]. London, England: Decca (1972, reissued 2004)
Clip 2: Minutes 2:25 to 2:47
APA style ref: Styne, J., Sondheim, S. (1959). Everything’s Coming Up Roses [Recorded by E. Merman, S. Black, London Festival Orchestra & Chorus]. On Merman Sings Merman [CD]. London, England: Decca (1972, reissued 2004)

Clip 3: Minutes 1:50 to 2:22
APA style ref: Porter, C. (1934). I Get a Kick Out of You [Recorded by E. Merman, S. Black, London Festival Orchestra & Chorus]. On Merman Sings Merman [CD]. London, England: Decca (1972, reissued 2004)
JOAN SUTHERLAND – Female operatic voice
Clip 1: Minutes 5:30 to 5:50
APA style ref: Bellini, V. (1831). Casta diva [Recorded by J. Sutherland, R. Bonynge, London Symphony Orchestra & Chorus]. On Joan Sutherland: The Greatest Hits [CD]. London, England: Decca (1998)
Clip 2: Minutes 4:03 to 4:24
APA style ref: Gounod, C. (1859, Rev. 1869). O Dieu! Que de bijoux! …Ah! je ris de me voir si belle (Jewel song) [Recorded by J. Sutherland, F. Molinari-Pradelli, Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden]. On Joan Sutherland: The Greatest Hits [CD]. London, England: Decca (1998)
STEVEN TYLER – Male rock voice
Clip 1: Minutes 3:24 to 3:45
APA style ref: Aerosmith (1973). Dream On. Aerosmith [CD]. New York: Columbia Records
Clip 2: Minutes 0:56 to 1:22
APA style ref: Aerosmith (1989). Janie’s Got a Gun. Pump [CD]. New York: Geffen Records
LUCIANO PAVAROTTI – Male operatic voice
Clip 1: Minutes 1:45 to 2:06
APA style ref: Verdi, G. (1851). La donna e mobile [Recorded by L. Pavarotti, A. Toscanini, Symphonic Orchestra of Emilia Romagna]. On Luciano Pavarotti in concert [CD]. New York: CBS Records
Clip 2: Minutes 1:20 to 1:35
APA style ref: Verdi, G. (1851). Questa o quella [Recorded by L. Pavarotti, A. Toscanini, Symphonic Orchestra of Emilia Romagna]. On Luciano Pavarotti in concert [CD]. New York: CBS Records
ROLLIN RACHELLE – (Male) Overtone singing (improperly referred to as “throat singing”)
Clip 1: 20 seconds long
APA style ref: Rachelle, R. (1995). Track 18. Overtone Singing Study Guide [Book/CD]. Amersterdam, Netherlands: Cryptic Voices Productions
GEORGIA BROWN – (Female) Whistle voice (not a person whistling!)
Clip 1: Seconds 0:08 to 0:21
Ref: Recording of Georgia Brown: sound clip from:www.dutchdivas.net/nighC.html (link to http://escravosdegeo.sites.uol.com.br/index1.htm) last accessed 12/05/07.
Clip 2: Minutes 0:54 to 1:00
Ref: Recording of Georgia Brown: sound clip from:www.dutchdivas.net/nighC.html (link to http://escravosdegeo.sites.uol.com.br/index1.htm) last accessed 12/05/07.

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http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=sound-clips-human-instrument&page=2

Stimmung de Karlheinz Stockhausen

Stimmung de Karlheinz Stockhausen

Stimmung Vocal Square.jpg 1

En 1968, Stockhausen écrit Stimmung (= s’accorder) qui manifeste des influences de philosophies extrême-orientales (en particulier les philosophies du Tibet et les philosophies bouddhistes).
Il s’agit de psalmodies vocales immensément étirées. Dans cette œuvres, les chanteurs doivent travailler en diphonie (la diphonie est utilisée par les moines tibétains pour accéder à la méditation). La diphonie consiste à modifier le moule de la bouche en émettant un son afin d’émettre en même temps une harmonique (en fonction de la voyelle émise, l’harmonique est différente… le « i » donne beaucoup d’harmoniques aigues) : c’est la formation de la boite crânienne qui fait qu’on a tous un timbre de voix différent. Dans cette technique de la diphonie, on en arrive à privilégier tellement certaines harmoniques qu’on fait vraiment entendre cette seule harmonique.

C’est une œuvre ouverte : le compositeur propose certaines choses et c’est aux musiciens de décider quand ils ont atteint le but demandé par le compositeur et de passer à une section suivante.

C’est une œuvre pour un chœur de 6 personnes (3 hommes et 3 femmes). Il y a une dimension spirituelle qui est présente. Stimme = la voix, Stimmung = humeur, atmosphère, disposition d’esprit (le caractère) mais aussi « s’accorder » (dans le sens musical et aussi sur le plan : « être d’accord »). Il y a pour chaque sections un leader qui mène le jeu : il propose une mélodie, un pattern qui est reproduit par les autres sur leur hauteur respective (formant un accord de neuvième sur sib : toute l’œuvre repose sur ce même accord). Quand les musiciens arrivent au moment où ils sont bien ensemble, quand ils ont atteint cette « stimmung », cette harmonie alors il passe à la section suivante et un autre chanteur devient le leader…
Stockhausen_-_Stimmung_harmonics.png 2
Accord de 9è dans Stimmung

L’œuvre est longue : environ 60 min.

La technique vocale repose entièrement sur la diphonie : cette technique sort de son contexte populaire d’origine car on l’intègre à une œuvre savante.

Stimmung Female models.jpg 3.jpg

L’œuvre est composé de 51 sections, la plupart étant consacrées à l’invocation d’une divinité avec des jeux mélodiques et rythmiques sur des mots répétés. Un chœur mixte fait entendre des ostinatos en polyphonie en même temps qu’un soliste : les sons émis par cette voix de basse sont des onomatopées. Il y a des jeux de souffle sur les sons « f », « ch », « i » et « u » puis apparaissent deux textes en allemand en parlé-chanté (sprechgesang), constitués par deux poèmes érotiques de Stockhausen. C’est une œuvre écrite dans un style de la deuxième moitié du XXè siècle, style « contemporain », marqué par l’emploi du parlé-chanté et des jeux de souffle.

Lors de l’exécution de la pièce, le concert se présente comme un « feu de camp hippie »4, les chanteurs s’assoient en cercle sur le sol, dans la position du lotus. L’œuvre se compose de 51 phases interprétées les unes après les autres. C’est autour de la note pivot si bémol que la pièce se déroule. Par moments, les interprètes doivent choisir un nom de Dieu (pré-noté sur la partition) et le chanter. On peut parler de Stimmung comme d’une œuvre indéterminée dans le sens que ce sont les interprètes qui choisissent le parcours mélodique et syllabique de la pièce.

La forme de l’oeuvre :
stimmung formschema 1.jpg 4

Voir aussi :
Stimmung — Wikipédia
Stockhausen – Sounds in Space: STIMMUNG

https://www.edmu.fr/2014/10/stimmung-de-karlheinz-stockhausen.html

WIKIPEDIA : STIMMUNG de Karlheinz Stockhausen

Stimmung
Image illustrative de l’article Stimmung
250px-Shiraz_36
Stockhausen au festival d’arts de Shiraz en septembre 1972 : au fond, debout, le technicien Volker Müller, le compositeur Karlheinz Stockhausen, avec (entre autres) les membres du Collegium Vocale Köln : Karl O. Barkey, Hans-Aldrich Billig, Wolfgang Lüttgen, Günther Engels, Christoph Caskel et devant, Péter Eötvös, Dagmar von Biel, Gaby Rodens, Wolfgang Fromme, Helga Hamm-Albrecht.
Genre musique contemporaine
Musique Karlheinz Stockhausen
Texte Karlheinz Stockhausen
Durée approximative 74 minutes
Dates de composition 1968
Création 9 décembre 1968
Maison de la radio, Paris
modifier Consultez la documentation du modèle

Stimmung, pour six chanteurs et six microphones, est une composition de Karlheinz Stockhausen, écrite en 1968 et commandée par la ville de Cologne pour le Collegium Vocale Köln. Sa durée est variable, du fait d’une certaine liberté laissée aux interprètes, celle des quatre enregistrements actuellement disponibles sur le marché dépasse une heure. Elle porte le numéro 24 dans le catalogue du compositeur. Elle a parfois été qualifiée d’œuvre à la fois sérielle et tonale1,2, bien qu’elle soit en réalité fort éloignée de ce que l’on place habituellement sous ces deux concepts. Elle tire son origine d’une précédente œuvre non terminée, écrite en 1960, intitulée Monophonie1.
Sommaire

1 Historique et influences
2 Structure
3 Réception et influence
4 Discographie
5 Bibliographie
6 Notes et références
7 Liens externes

Historique et influences

Stimmung a été composé aux États-Unis en février et mars 1968, alors que Stockhausen revenait d’un voyage en Californie, au Mexique et à Hawaï. Elle est dédicacée au peintre Mary Bauermeister3. Le compositeur écrit l’œuvre près du détroit de Long Island, sous la neige, une mer gelée et un fort vent continu4.

Une influence souvent mentionnée à propos de Stimmung est celle qu’a exercée le minimaliste La Monte Young, et la musique qu’il développe dans les années 60 avec son ensemble The Dream Syndicate5. Bien que Young ait été l’étudiant de Stockhausen, Stimmung est une pièce « à la La Monte Young », d’après Steve Reich6.
Structure

L’œuvre est composé de 51 sections, la plupart étant consacrées à l’invocation d’une divinité avec des jeux mélodiques et rythmiques sur des mots répétés. Un chœur mixte fait entendre des ostinatos en polyphonie en même temps qu’un soliste : les sons émis par cette voix de basse sont des onomatopées. Il y a des jeux de souffle sur les sons « f », « ch », « i » et « u » puis apparaissent deux textes en allemand en parlé-chanté (sprechgesang), constitués par deux poèmes érotiques de Stockhausen. C’est une œuvre écrite dans un style de la deuxième moitié du XXe siècle, style « contemporain », marqué par l’emploi du parlé-chanté et des jeux de souffle.

Lors de l’exécution de la pièce, le concert se présente comme un « feu de camp hippie »4, les chanteurs s’assoient en cercle sur le sol, dans la position du lotus. L’œuvre se compose de 51 phases interprétées les unes après les autres. C’est autour de la note pivot si bémol que la pièce se déroule. Par moments, les interprètes doivent choisir un nom de Dieu (pré-noté sur la partition) et le chanter. On peut parler de Stimmung comme d’une œuvre indéterminée dans le sens que ce sont les interprètes qui choisissent le parcours mélodique et syllabique de la pièce.
Réception et influence

Stimmung a été créé à Paris le 9 décembre 1968 à la Maison de la radio et a reçu un accueil favorable, ainsi que lors de ses représentations successives en Europe4. Certains critiques se sont montrés réservés au sujet des poèmes osés écrits par le compositeur et de l’aspect rituel de la pièce4.

Stimmung aura une influence sur certains compositeurs de musique spectrale, notamment Tristan Murail, Magnus Lindberg, Gérard Grisey7,4.
Discographie

Collegium Vocale Köln : Dagmar Apel, Gaby Rodens, sopranos ; Helga Albrecht, alto ; Wolfgang Fromme (dir.) et Georg Steinhoff, ténor ; Hans-Alderich Billig, basse (30-31 octobre 1969, LP Deutsche Grammophon 2720025 / 2561 043) (notice BnF no FRBNF38075429)
Collegium Vocale Köln : Dagmar von Biel et Gaby Ortmann-Rodens, sopranos ; Helga Hamm-Albrecht, alto ; Wolfgang Fromme et Helmut Clemens, ténor ; Hans Alderich Billig, basse ; dir. Karlheinz Stockhausen (1969, « Zeitgenössische Musik in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland vol. 7 », LP Deutsche Harmonia Mundi) (OCLC 179764113)
Singcircle : Suzanne Flowers, Penelope Walmsley-Clark, Nancy Long, Rogers Covey-Crump, Gregory Rose (dir.), Paul Hillier (27-28 janvier 1983, Hyperion CDA66115) (OCLC 61747241)
Theatre of Voices : Else Torp, Louise Skovbæch, Clara Sanabras, Wolodymyr Smishkewych, Kasper Eliassen, Andrew Hendricks, dir. Paul Hillier – version Copenhague (2006, SACD Harmonia Mundi HMU 807408) (OCLC 717345600)

Bibliographie

(it) Hubert Stuppner, « Serialità e misticismo in Stimmung di K. Stockhausen. » (Nuova) Rivista Musicale Italiana 8, no 1, janvier-mars 1974, p. 83-98.
Michel Rigoni, « Karlheinz Stockhausen: Stimmung: Six chanteurs en quête d’harmonie. » Analyse Musicale 4e trimestre, 1992, p. 75–83.
(en) Keith Potter, Four Musical Minimalists: La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Cambridge University Press, 2000 (ISBN 0-521-01501-4)
(en) Steve Reich, Writings on Music 1965-2000, Oxford University Press, 2002 (ISBN 978-0-19-515115-2)
(en) Richard Toop, « Stimmung », dans Richard Toop, Six Lectures from the Stockhausen Courses Kürten 2002, Kürten : Stockhausen-Verlag, 2005, p. 39–71. (ISBN 3-00-016-185-6)

Notes et références
(en) Cet article est partiellement ou en totalité issu de l’article de Wikipédia en anglais intitulé « Stimmung » (voir la liste des auteurs).

↑ a et b Toop 2005, p. 39
↑ Stuppner 1974
↑ Rose G, Ireland H, notice de l’enregistrement de l’œuvre, Singcircle, éditions Hypérion
↑ a b c d et e Patrick Szersnovicz, Stimmung de Karlheinz Stockhausen, le Monde de la musique, février 2009, p. 50-51
↑ Potter (2000), p. 89
↑ Reich (2002), p. 202
↑ Rigoni 1992, p. 83

Liens externes
Notices d’autorité

: Fichier d’autorité international virtuel • Bibliothèque nationale de France (données) • Bibliothèque du Congrès • Gemeinsame Normdatei • Bibliothèque nationale d’Israël • WorldCat

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Œuvre de Karlheinz StockhausenMusique minimaliste

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La dernière modification de cette page a été faite le 8 mars 2017 à 15:08.
https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stimmung

Karlheinz Stockhausen: Stimmung (1968)

Wellesz Theatre.
Published on May 6, 2012
Karlheinz Stockhausen (1928-2007): Stimmung, per 6 voci (1968).

Collegium vocale Köln diretto da Karlheinz Stockhausen.

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HIMMELKVAD The Nordic Council Music Prize 2010 was awarded to the Norwegian composer Lasse Thoresen in 2010

Album
2L075_box-B

Album title
HIMMELKVAD
Performer
Nordic Voices
Berit Opheim Versto
Catalogue #
2L-075-SABD
EAN13
7041888515623
ISRC-code
NOMPP1201010-100
Disc 1
Hybrid SACD
MCH 5.0 DSD
Stereo DSD
Disc 2

Pure Audio Blu-ray
DTS HD MA 192kHz/24 bit 5.0
LPCM 192kHz/24 bit STEREO
mShuttle: FLAC 96kHz + MP3
Region: ABC – worldwide
Release date
February 2012
Recording date
June and October 2010
Location
Sofienberg Church, Norway
Original source
DXD (352.8kHz/24bit)

HIMMELKVAD

The Nordic Council Music Prize 2010 was awarded to the Norwegian composer Lasse Thoresen. His “Opus 42” represents a true renewal of Nordic vocal music. This strikingly beautiful piece reveals the common denominators in ancient and ultra-modern sounds, drawing our attention to the similarities between Scandinavian folk traditions and the music we might find in, say, the Middle East or India. Lasse Thoresen not only uses folk sounds to spice up art music, he also integrates its finely tuned microtonality, spectral overtones, harmonies and rhythms into the contemporary, modernist project in a truly pioneering manner. A project like this depends upon close collaboration with skilled musicians who are willing to take risks. Thoresen found them in the vocal ensemble Nordic Voices and folk singer Berit Opheim Versto.

Artistic creativity, versatility and technical precision are the main elements that make up NORDIC VOICES. The six-voice a cappella group was formed in 1996 and comprises graduates from the Norwegian Academy of Music and the Norwegian Academy of Opera, who, in addition to their singing backgrounds, have a broad range of experience from choral conducting to teacher training and composition. It is perhaps this range of interests that leads them to explore a wider than usual spectrum of musical expression, from plainchant to new works commissioned from leading Norwegian composers; from the most sacred of religious texts to the definitely profane. Nordic Voices are an unusual blend of sophisticated music-making and stylish performance, more often than not with more than a dash of humour.

http://www.2l.no/pages/album/075.html

HIMMELKVAD , composition by LASSE THORESEN , performed by Nordic Voices Nordic Voices performing Lasse Thoresen

HIMMELKVAD , composition by LASSE THORESEN , performed by Nordic Voices
Nordic Voices performing Lasse Thoresen
Photo: Lars Igesund
Himmelkvad
Celebrated vocal ensemble Nordic Voices is currently out on its promo tour for their new outing ‘Himmelkvad’, a critically acclaimed album presenting Norwegian composer Lasse Thoresen’s unique vocal universe. MIC Norway takes a closer look at the cutting-edge vocal ensemble and ground-breaking composer.
08.02.2012 | By: Hilde Holbæk-Hanssen
The same things happen whenever we switch to overtone singing, be it in Luzerne or in an Ohio junction; people will always crane their necks, searching for those flutes that they hear but can’t see, says Frank Havrøy, baritone in vocal sextet Nordic Voices.
The celebrated vocal ensemble is now heading out on its promo tour for their new outing ‘Himmelkvad’ (Heavenly Sounds), an album that presents Norwegian composer Lasse Thoresen’s vocal universe. Nordic Voices performs his Opus 42, a work that earned the composer the 2012 Nordic Council Music Prize. The new release also features vocalist Berit Opheim Versto performing Thoresen’s ‘Sacred Songs’ – six Bahá’i prayers.
Nordic Voices – Himmelkvad on Spotify

Since the late 70s, Thoresen has focused on expanding the vocal palette singers utilize as an addition to the operatic style which has been prevalent in classical singing. His quest began in 1977 when he recruited folk ballad singer Birgitte Grimstad as soloist for a work commissioned for the opening of the Oslo Concert Hall. Says Thoresen: – She had that non-vibrato voice I was searching for – a voice that produces more overtones than the artificial voice classical vocalists employ.
Berit Opheim represented a new, major inspirational source when she enrolled at the vocal course at of the Norwegian Academy of Music where Thoresen served as professor. Opheim came from a folk music background and mastered the traditional Norwegian vocal style ‘kveding’, a singing style that has never surrendered to the limitations of the tempered scale. Thoresen found this to be highly interesting and a close collaboration ensued, resulting in a number of works. 1998 saw Opheim premiering his cantata Fire and Light at the Warsaw Autumn; the work not only featured the use of quarter tones, even eight tones were introduced. – It was pretty challenging, Opheim admits.
As a classically trained vocalist, Opheim effortlessly moves between performance styles using quarter tones as found in Norwegian traditional folk music as well as conventional half- and whole tone harmony in classical pieces, improvised sessions and early music performances. – It’s not as difficult as it might sound like, Opheim explains. – One has to change the mind-set, realizing that traditional folk music is a style that differs from the others. For me, it was inspiring to work with a professor of composition who was genuinely interested in folk music; back then there weren’t too many of them around!
Traditional folk music was not the sole inspirational source Thoresen turned to: For a number of years he focused on the French spectral composition scene, in particular composer Guy Reibel. During a 2002 stint as lecturer at Paris’ Conservatoire Superieure, Thoresen took on inspiration from Reibel’s works featuring body energy based approaches to vocal improvisation; Jeux Vocaux, as well as David Hykes; one of the true masters of contemporary overtone singing.
Thus, the founding idea for the Concrescence Project was conceived. A key event for the project came when the Nordic Voices ensemble marched into Thoresen’s office to discuss the future of classical singing. The ensemble was aware of the composer’s ideas for expanding classical singers’ timbre palette and was keen on getting involved.
Says the ensemble: – The talks went on quite longer than first expected, and it became apparent that we shared the same views; it should be possible to add something to what we felt was a rigid classical vocal paradigm. Lasse had a clear vision of what this ‘something’ should be, and we realized we were now embarking on a project that had a much wider scope than the projects we had focused on previously. The project was titled Concrescence, and backed by the Ultima Oslo Contemporary Music Festival and the Norwegian Academy of Music we were soon immersed in the intricacies of overtone singing. Parallel to this, a new sonorous landscape evolved in front of us and we realized we were on a path that could lead us to new forms of singing, a vocal style that the world had yet to see or hear.
The project progressed rapidly. Aided by such vocal masters as Vietnamese performer Tran Quang Hai, Nordic Voices steadily progressed, mastering the various aspects of overtone singing. Intensive microtonal ear training, taught by Gro Shetelig of the Norwegian Academy of Music, was soon on the ensemble’s hectic schedule. With a basis in this new sonorous universe, Nordic Voices now commissioned new works by six Norwegian composers, all of which were premiered at the 2006 Ultima Oslo Contemporary Music Festival.
Says Thoresen: – Nordic Voices were now capable of doing amazing things – exactly what I had been envisioning that a vocal ensemble could do.
Classical singers are hardly known for being willing to expand their tonal and technical skills in unconventional ways. The fear of wearing out one’s voice is prevalent – and often rightfully so. According to Nordic Voices soprano (and opera singer) Tone Elisabeth Braaten, an unconventional approach to classical singing can also have positive benefits for one’s voice. Says Braaten: -I feel that my voice is much more flexible now than before. As long as it doesn’t hurt it won’t harm me!
Baritone Frank Havrøy feels that focusing on this project has also taught the singers a methodology for rehearsing new sonorous effects. – Navigating in uncharted waters is fun, says Havrøy. This process has also taught us that there exists a kinship between various traditional vocal folk music styles throughout the world.
The Concrescence Project continues its development. A number of singers, including one of Europe’s prime choirs; the Latvian Radio Choir, now master the tonal and vocal-technical skills necessary to tackle a project of Concrescence’s calibre. In Frank Havrøy’s opinion, new generations of young composers and vocalists now represent a much greater openness towards unconventional thinking. During the current US tour, Nordic Voices are to hold crash courses in overtone singing in Lakeville and Annapolis. On home turf, Thoresen is heavily involved in the training of composers at the Norwegian Academy of Music, and is actively encouraging students to write works for vocal ensembles.
When asked whether if new vocal styles will be added to the on-going project, Thoresen replies with a sly smile: – I’ve got some ideas…
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| By: Hilde Holbæk-Hanssen
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Nordic Voices performing Lasse Thoresen

lasse thoresen
Lasse Thoresen
Composer, Professor
Lasse Thoresen is Professor at the Norwegian Academy, where he has thaught composition, electrophny and sonology snce 1975. He studied composition under Finn Mortensen, Oslo Music Conservatory, electrophony and composition at the Institute of Sonology in the Netherlands. His works have achieved high recognition in Norway and internationally, and he has received a number of important awards such as the Nordic Council Music Prize, the Work of the Year from the Society of Norwegian Composers, Norwegian Critics Award, Norwegian Grammy, the Lindeman Award, the Foundation Samii-Housseinpour Price (Belgium), and Prix Jacques DURAND (France). His music has absorbed influences from archaic Norwegian folk music and ethnomusic” in general, from French spectral music and “Musique Concrete”, and from Harry Partch’s tonal system “Just Intonation”. Under the headline Aural Sonology he has developed a theory of emergent musical forms, and methods of aural analysis of electroacoustic music. (For more information see: Biography – from mic.no)

Web: http://www.lassethoresen.com
Email: lasse@lassethoresen.com

Born: 18.10.1949 (Oslo)

compositions by AKI YLI SALOMÄKI, concert in Finland, 15 january 2013

compositions by AKI YLI SALOMÄKI, concert in Finland, 15 january 2013

 
Aki Yli-Salomäki (b. 1972)

  • Uusinta Chamber Ensemble performs compositions by Finnish composer Aki Yli-Salomäki. Free entrance, no intermission, duration of the concert is ca. 1 hour. Welcome!

    Aki Yli-Salomäki (b. 1972) studied composition with Harri Vuori at the University of Helsinki. His music has been described as “deep northern” slow-listening music manifested by grand sonority and soaring melodic arcs. Yli-Salomäki`s music consists mainly of orchestral works and concertos, but smaller character pieces are an important part of his ouvre as well. His music has been performed in Europe, Russia, Mexico, India, United States and Asia

    PROGRAMME:

    Odota (2010) for quitar
    Valotomu (2010–2011) for quitar and string quartet (f.p.)
    Täälläolo (2010) for string quartet (f.p.)
    Hohka (2011–2012) for string quartet
    Paikka (2012) for oboe and throat-singer (f.p.)
    Nightfall (2010–2011) for clarinet and string quartet

    PERFORMERS:

    Petri Kumela, quitar
    Eeva-Kaisa Rönkä, oboe
    Olli Leppäniemi, clarinet
    Sauli Heikkilä, throat-singing
    Uusinta String Quartet: Maria Puusaari and Annemarie Åström, violins, Max Savikangas, viola, Markus Hohti, violoncello

                              Sauli Heikkilä, throat-singing

Throat Singing by The Gyuto Monks of Tibet • Pure Sounds • Mandala Offering

Throat Singing by The Gyuto Monks of Tibet • Pure Sounds • Mandala Offering 

Uploaded on Nov 30, 2010

A sample track, “Mandala Offering”, from the Grammy-nominated throat singing album Pure Sounds.
Listen on iTunes http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/pure-sounds/id365783293

The Gyuto Monks of Tibet are masters of a deep harmonic overtone chanting, also known as throat singing. The sound has been compared to the resonance of a drum or digeridoo and is believed to have a transformative effect — removing impurities and clearing the path to enlightenment.

2011 Grammy-nominated album in the Traditional World Music category!