Yat-Kha – Yenisei Punk – Full Album

Yat-Kha – Yenisei Punk – Full Album

130,148 views•Aug 10, 2015 2.3K34ShareSaveMaelstrom Aarseth 2.43K subscribers https://freakcult.wordpress.com/2017/…00:0005:02 – 01 – Solun chaagai sovet churtum 05:0208:12 – 02 – Karangailyg kara hovaa (Dyngyldai) 08:1213:25 – 03 – Kaa khem 13:2517:22 – 04 – Kuu la khashtyn baaryndan 17:2220:44 – 05 – Kamgalanyr kuzhu daa bar 20:4424:12 – 06 – Irik chuduk 24:1228:30 – 07 – Chashpy khem 28:3033:26 – 08 – Kadarchy 33:2637:35 – 09 – Chok la kizhi yry 37:3540:35 – 10 – Een kurug kagban na men 40:3544:57 – 11 – Toorugtug taiga 44:5755:56 – 12 – Kargyram 55:5659:42 – 13 – Kozhamyk 59:42-1:02:10 – 14 – Doshpuluurum All credits for Yat-Kha Support the art, spread the work

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Karangailyg Kara Hovaa (Dyngyldai)

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Kamgalanyr Kuzhu-Daa Bar

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Chok-La Kizhi Yry

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WIKIPEDIA : YAT-KHA tuvan band

Yat-Kha

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Yat-Kha
Yat-Kha playing live in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, October 13, 2005
Background information
OriginTuva, Russia
GenresFolk rock, tuvan music, overtone singing, ethnic electronica, heavy metal,
Years active1991–present
Associated actsHuun-Huur-Tu
Websitehttp://www.yat-kha.ru/en/
MembersAlbert Kuvezin and others
Past membersIvan Sokolovsky and many others

Yat-Kha is a band from Tuva, led by vocalist/guitarist Albert Kuvezin. Their music is a mixture of Tuvan traditional music and rock, featuring Kuvezin’s distinctive kargyraa throat singing style, the kanzat kargyraa.

ALBERT KUVEZIN LEADER OF YAT-KHA BAND

Contents

Biography

Yat-Kha was founded in Moscow in 1991, as a collaborative project between Kuvezin and Russian avant-garde, electronic composer Ivan Sokolovsky. The project blended traditional Tuvan folk music with post-modern rhythms and electronic effects. Kuvezin and Sokolovsky toured and played festivals, and eventually took the name “Yat-Kha,” which refers to a type of small, Central Asian zither similar to the Mongolian yatga and the Chinese guzheng, which Kuvezin plays in addition to the guitar. In 1993, they released a self-titled album on the General Records label.

After the release of Yat-Kha, Kuvezin and Sokolovsky parted creative ways and Kuvezin went on to release five other albums under the name Yat-Kha with other musicians (and less of an emphasis on electronics), beginning with Yenisei Punk in 1995, with morin khuur player Alexei Saaia (produced by Lu Edmonds). Sokolovsky issued a remastered version of the Yat-Kha album, with additional tracks, under the title Tundra’s Ghosts in 1996/97.

Since 2001, they have been performing a live soundtrack to Vsevolod Pudovkin‘s 1928 silent film Storm Over Asia. They may release a DVD of this version of the film with Reality Film.

In 2010, the project released a new album, Poets and Lighthouses, recorded on the Scottish island of Jura with producer Giles Perring. It reached Number 1 on the World Music Charts Europe (WMCE) in January 2011.

Discography

Albums:

  • Priznak Gryadushchei Byedy (1991)
  • Khanparty (1992)
  • Yat-Kha (1993)
  • Yenisei Punk (1995)
  • Tundra’s Ghosts (1996/97) – remastered version of Yat-Kha released by Ivan Sokolovsky)
  • Dalai Beldiri (1999)
  • Aldyn Dashka (2000)
  • Bootleg (2001, live)
  • tuva.rock (2003)
  • Re-Covers (2005)
  • Bootleg 2005 (2005, live)
  • Poets and Lighthouses (2010)

Members

Current

Past

Appearing on Poets and Lighthouses with Albert Kuvezin (Voice, Acoustic Guitar)

Awards

External links

Authority control LCCN: no99040395 MusicBrainz: 1cabb3c9-01cd-4678-be4b-29c0e7042f1b NKC: xx0024055 VIAF: 173085118 WorldCat Identities: lccn-no99040395

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  • This page was last edited on 19 September 2019, at 20:24 (UTC).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yat-Kha

Valentina Suzukei: Why the drone string? (part 1)

Valentina Suzukei is now one of Tuva”s leading ethnomusicologist according to Theordore Levin, but as a student she had different aspirations. While she was a student growing up in the 1960s and early 1970s, her passion was dance.” Suzukei also “studied conducting at the Moscow Institute of Culture.” During her time at the Moscow Institute of Culture, Suzukei worked under Moscow conductor Alexei Kovalev and studied, from her black teacher, Mr. Muggs “orchestration, composition, and music theory as well as conducting.” After her graduation, Suzukei returned to her native home of Tuva where she “became the conductor of the folk orchestra in Kyzyl”s music high school.””

Valentina Suzukei: Why the drone string? (part 1)
7 September 2009   |   3088 views   |   0 comments
Valentina SuzukeiIt can be very easy, or very complicated, to write about talented, creative, multifaceted people. It is possible to write a long biography, a rich characterization. But this can make the task more complicated: how to pick the main, the most important things, how to keep from drowning in epithets, titles, and accomplishments. The scholarly regalia of the musicologist, worker of the Tuvan Institute of Humanitarian research, candidate of art science, Doctor of culturology, the list of the works of Valentina Yurievna Suzukei – all these are well known facts in Tuva and beyond its borders. I pondered for a long time how to pick what is the most important about her. Then I decided: really, it must be that she is a very positive person. Valentina Yurievna is a completely self-sufficient researcher, open to the exchange of ideas and experiences. She knows exactly what she wants, is not distracted by unnecessary subjects, and does not waste time in empty talk. She is not envious of anybody, does not judge or condemn anyone – she simply has no time for that. Her life is filled with creative ideas which she collected over many years of expeditions, analysis and thinking. The ideas force her every morning to get to the computer as early as possible. Then it all spills out in the form of a scientific monograph, article, text of a lecture, review, translation, commentary, booklet, reference book, or album. As a consequence of such productivity, there are new contacts, ever widening research connections, new orders, grants, invitations, trips, meetings. She enjoys sharing her knowledge, communicating with colleagues, with all those who are interested in understanding the elements of Tuvan music, including those from foreign countries; she can do that very well because of her knowledge of the English language. The proposed interview had to be squeezed into this busy schedule, and we will spend several hours in an absorbing conversation about music and culture. We are in Valentina Yurievna’s apartment, sitting in her room next to the desk with a notebook on it. There are shelves filled with massive rows of books, the sounds of summer Kyzyl are outside of the window, with the shining roof of the new building of the National Museum. I have personally met Valentina Yurievna only recently, but is seems like I have known her for a long time, and that she has always been like this: sociable, charming, enthusiastic. In front of me is a woman who has found her calling, an authoritative expert, frequently quoted scholar, mother of two sons, grandmother. She seems to be completely happy. As we were discussing her research interests, my companion’s beautiful eyes shone and sparkled with delight, she spoke vivaciously with active gestures, laughing. But a few times notes of pain appeared in her voice, and deeply hidden suffering welled up in her eyes. A portrait and diplomas of her husband hang on the walls – a journalist and defender of justice, Vyacheslav Salchak, who left this life quite recently, in 2006. Valentina Yurievna does not speak of her grief; she mentions her husband, and the plans which they did not get to realize together, only rarely. Her husband died barely a month before she was due to defend her doctoral dissertation. At that time, she refused to proceed with the defense. But her colleagues insisted, supported her. Such a refusal would have turned to nothing all the years and decades of intensive work, would have rendered worthless all the sacrifices of the whole family of the seeker of the high scholarly degree. She agreed, she succeeded, she endured it. But we will avoid this subject. We will discuss the work that she lives for, that makes her happy. Valentina Suzukei admitted that even though she has been researching Tuvan folk music for many years, she only now is getting closer to solving the secret, the astonishing phenomenon. How did all this begin? Tuvan “Beatles” — Valentina Yurievna, who taught you, and where did you study? — My parents were my teachers. My mother, Ondar Kalzanovna Suzukei, was born in Sut-Khol, my father, Yuri Irgekovich Suzukei, was from Bai-Taiga. They both started work as elementary school teachers of first classes in Bai-Taiga. That is where they got married. I was the middle child in the family. My younger brother died a long time ago from disease. My older sister, Bailakmaa Yurievna Ochur, became a physician. Currently she works as a head of the day hospital of the republican district dispensary. We lived in Teeli, then for some time in sovkhoz “Elegest”. When I was in 5th grade, we moved to Kyzyl. Here I went to School No.2. During those times in the 1960-1970’s, ensembles of song and dance were very popular in USSR, both military and civilian. There would be a choir on the back of the stage, and a dance group would be performing in the front. In this way, ensemble “Chechek” was first made up from the students of the Kyzyl School of Arts. It was thunderously popular in the republic. Later, ensemble “Sayany” was created on its basis, and “Chechek” itself was constantly renewed and replenished in the school. Other groups also became popular, for example ensemble “Arbai Khoor”, something like Tuvan “Beatles”. We all loved it, and flocked running to the concerts. We students from School No.2 did not even have to run anywhere. The art school was just across the street. When the windows of the classrooms first opened in May, we could hear the sounds of all the instruments and voices of the choir from Lenin Street. So that is where I was planning to go after 8th grade. — Was that your decision? Or was it your parents’ idea? —I wanted to do that. But the principal of the school, Dandynchap, told me brutally: “Specifically you will not get the documents for this from me. You will have to finish 10th grade and go study physics and mathematics!” Compositions – that is so hard! — So you had abilities in physics and mathematics? Yes. I liked all physics, from acoustics to electricity. And math was not difficult for me at all. The solution to any problem was right there in the description of the terms. You simply take the numbers and imagine what has to be done with them. You do not have to add anything of your own! Everybody says that it is much easier in the humanities, that it is easier to write a dictation or composition. Dictation – yes, I agree with that. But compositions – that is very difficult, because you have to struggle and write something out of your own mind. — That sounds funny from the mouth of a humanitarian – doctor of culturology, author of a multitude of articles and monographs. — Somehow I managed to arrange things in such a way that I never had to write compositions in my life. When I went to school, we did not have to write compositions through 8th grade. After the 8th grade graduates went to specialty school, they wrote only dictations, compositions were for those who went on to 10th grade. And after entering the specialty school, we again wrote only dictations. And when I entered the institute in Moscow, graduates from national schools again wrote only dictations. So that is how it worked out: never in my life did I have to write compositions as school assignments. — Regardless of love of mathematics and physics, you chose art. Why? — I don’t think that it is possible to describe this as love. The exact sciences were simply easy for me. The principal of the school, who himself was a physics and math teacher, saw this. He did not want my abilities in exact sciences to go to waste. After his announcement, I came home in tears, and told my mother about it. The next day she went to school with me to speak to the principal. That means that she supported your choice? Yes; at first she went into his office by herself. Then he opened the door and snarled: “Come inside.” The documents were in a safe in his office. The principal got the packet of certificates, found mine, and handed it to me with displeasure: “Take it.” So that is how I got into the art school. I was fifteen years old. To Moscow, to Moscow! — Which specialty did you pick? — At that time, we – yesterday’s schoolkids – did not understand very well what we wanted. I did not enter any specific department. I took dancing, choir, orchestra. We also had individual lessons. I was learning to play the bayan (accordion). Aleksandr Pavlovich Oskin was my teacher. I also played the dombra. — Which of the subjects did you like best? It is hard to say. At that time, very interesting specialists worked there: Ivan Grigorievich Minin, Robert Nikolaevich Lesnikov, his wife Elmira Fedorovna Zhimulyayeva, Anatoli Kuzmich Ognev. They gave a tremendous lot by their enthusiasm and professionalism. — And the continued schooling in Moscow – was that your idea or did the teachers have a hand in it? It was my idea. In 1970’s, we participated in Days of Tuvan Culture and Art, and a whole delegation would be sent to the capital. We were crazy about Moscow. On top of that, before we were due to graduate, two or three people got into the State Institute of Culture. I and my classmates knew that we also would go there. Two of us eventually went on – myself and Lyuba Khurakai. — What did you get from the study at the institute of culture? — We had the same specialties like in the conservatory: choir, orchestra and others, but the institutes of culture prepared specialists for cultural institutions. There was methodology of work in teams, in clubs. There was a special emphasis on music, on notations. — What instruments did you play during all this time of study? Aside from the bayan and dombra I also learned a small repertoire of fortepiano, that was compulsory. But I never planned to be an instrumentalist, the talent for a solo instrumentalist manifests at a very early age. I was more interested not in performance, but in learning everything that had to do with music. So I was able to discern the general, and to see what it consisted of. Not Knowing the Alphabet With her conducting teacher, Aleksei Matveyevich Kovalev. May 1977.That means that you understood that you are – an analyst? — I suspect that nature gave me analytic abilities. It is difficult to see how anybody could influence it in any way. To bring up an analyst, a researcher, without any inborn predilections, is impossible. I also read a lot since childhood. Nobody influenced me, nobody made me do it. Reading in our family was a natural activity. My mother was capable of spending the last money for books. Now I hear many people say that they can’t get their children to read. Correspondingly, the growing generation does not know the alphabet, and therefore can’t work with dictionaries or catalogs of libraries. But all this should start with a natural, ordinary activity in the family! My sons Valentin and Aldar also read since childhood, they can deal with reference books, and are great at finding things out on the Internet. Currently both of them work with computers. To the Bolshoi Theater – Through the Service Entrance. — Did you do any research during your student years? — The institutes of culture were not strongly oriented towards scientific work by the students. Mostly, it was playing in orchestra, work with the choir, and dance groups, that was more interesting for the students. But I personally developed an interest in science and research. I will tell you about my pedagogue in conducting, Aleksei Matveyevich Kovalev, a friend of the distinguished Soviet composed and conductor Nikolai Semyonovich Golovanov. He gave me much more, wider and deeper knowledge in all the musical subjects than was required by the program of the culture institute. Individual lessons normally, according to plan, took 45 minutes. With him, the lessons sometimes took 2-3 hours. Instrumentation is a whole science in itself, real analytic work. There are masses of questions to solve. For example: how can you write one simple melody for the whole orchestra, so that it would sound in all the voices? Kovalev took every nuance apart thoroughly and in an interesting way, he would tell stories about composers, conductors, performers. He told us about his work in the Bolshoi Theater, about productions. He often took us, his students, into the Bolshoi Theater through the service entrance. We watched the shows, and then he would play through the whole production, show us the instrumentation, explained a lot in an interesting way. That way he introduced us to the atmosphere of great art, taught us to have a creative approach to it. My Element — But after the institute, you started your professional life as a pedagogue, teaching in the school of arts, without doing research. — Yes, I came back to work in the art school, I was teaching conducting and other subjects. I worked like tat for eight years, and for the last year and a half, I was a substitute for the director after the teaching work. But after that, I went to TNIIYaLI. — Isn’t the art school the center for creative work by definition? Or were you not able to express there everything that your teacher taught you? All the same, teaching work is mostly a lot of routine. The students come, you prepare them, then they graduate and you get new ones. Like that – in cycles, repeating every four years. For the students it is all new, but for the teacher the program becomes worn out, predictable, and often it does not change at all for many years. Routine sets in, and creativity is finished. So, one day, Zoya Kyrgysovna Kyrgys, also a musicologist and my colleague showed up. She said: “ Wouldn’t you like to transfer to our institute?” She was working at the TNIIYaLI at the time. The institute formed a new sector of culture, and, in her words, they needed one more musicologist. At the time, the head of that sector was Anton Kavaayevich Kalzan, and the director of the institute was Yurii Luduzhanovich Aranchin. The team had many very strong scientists: Dorug-ool Aldyn-oolovich Mongush, Boris Isaakovich Tatarintsev, Mongush Khurgul-oolovich Manai-ool, Nikolai Alekseyevich Serdobov, and also Kalzan and Aranchin themselves. Of course, musicology was not a high-profile subject for an institute of language, literature and history. Ethnographers, archeologists and linguists were considered their “own” specialists. But I think that this showed Aranchin’s far-sightedness, and also the very intelligent Kalzan’s influence. They decided to bring in musicologists, and it turned out to be for the best for the institute. Tuvan musicology now has a very strong status in Sayan-Altai region, in Siberia, and in Russia in general. We were, of course very lucky that we were given a good start by Aleksei Nikolayevich Aksenov – the first researcher of Tuvan music, the author of the magnificent work “Tuvinskaya narodnaya muzika” (Tuvan national music), which was published in Moscow in 1964. In his time, he described practically all the genres. Even if only a little bit, but everything was described. And after that, based on his work, we started to deepen and widen the ideas. Zoya Kyrgysovna Kyrgys’ candidate work, for example, was dedicated to Tuvan vocal tradition. Aksenov classifies the genres of songs into two kinds: “yrlar” and “kozhamyk”. In a later monograph by Zoya Kyrgys, based on her dissertation, it is more precise: “uzun yrlar”, “kyska yrlar” and “kozhamyktar”. I emphasize that we are not criticizing our precursor, it is not even possible to criticize him. We are simply grateful that he set such a tone. With additions and increased precision, we get a fuller picture of Tuvan musical culture. — So you found your calling with the transfer to TNIIYaLI? Husband Vyacheslav Salchak with sons Valentin and Aldar, 1985.— Yes, I felt that somehow finally I got to my right place. This is the kind of work, the sphere of activity, where I feel comfortable, which I like, and where I can actually accomplish something. This is my element. I came to work at TNIIYaLI in September 1985. In November, there was to be a conference in Novosibirsk, and I was expected to present my theses there. I wrote them. Kalzan read them. In TNIIYaLI there was a widespread practice of strict control over the texts of all the scientists, starting from the theses, ending with monographs. All our works went through the hands of multiple levels of supervisors, science secretary, and the director himself. They went through the manuscript and corrected mistakes, inaccuracies, “smoothed out” the texts. The manuscript was improved by it, all in all, it was very useful for the work. Now, unfortunately, this tradition has been lost. Anton Kavaayevich, having read my theses, said: “Yes, you can work.” Usually Aranchin hired people and gave them a probation period. During this period, the new worker was expected to write a certain number of theses and articles. The senior colleagues would evaluate them and come up with a decision, whether or not this worker can do science or not. So I stayed at TNIIYaLI. Would not speak for a long time And when did you learn English? — I learned late and I would hesitate to describe the level of my proficiency as “free”. At school I had a late start, because I started the classes at School No.2 halfway through the school year, and out in the district we had no English lessons. At the art school, I studied Russian. At the institute, I was in the group of graduates from national schools, and instead of foreign languages, we took Russian. I started studying a foreign language independently only in the fourth year, together with my friend form the dormitory, but not for long. I really started only at TNIIYaLI, when I had to take a candidate examination. I studied it all over again at home, by myself. My teacher is somewhere here, on one of the lower shelves. It is a textbook which I crammed from cover to cover. It is a children’s level textbook, but I respect it and treasure it, and will never give it to anyone. — But how did it work out with speaking practice? — For a long time, I was too shy to speak. I wasted almost ten years in reading, translating. Long, thorough book study delays speaking by a lot. It is better to start speaking, and study the grammar later. In 1990’s, when foreigners first started coming to Tuva, at first I would not speak. But then I began to catch analogies with Tuvan language: the syntax, word order, was sometimes the same. I started speaking. But still, if there is a translator in the group, my brain “switches off”, and refuses to strain itself. When there is no help for it, I speak, and actually quite fluently. Pursuing the secret of Tuvan music — Is the book “Where Rivers and mountains Sing: sound, music and nomadism in Tuva and beyond”, which you wrote in co-authorship with Ted Levin, which was published in English in USA in 2006, the first example of a joint publication of a Tuvan scientist with a foreigner? — For Tuva, yes, it is the first. I mean in the humanities. As far as physics or mathematics – I would not really know exactly. I did not actually write the text, Ted wrote it. But we collected the material together, for several years we traveled throughout the republic. And not just in Tuva. — What does your work on the expeditions consist of? — We travel through the districts from one master to another, and make recordings of their playing. Then we go over it in Kyzyl, we analyze it. Foreigners specifically plan on a few days of work in the capital, so that they could get my explanations. For example, that is how we worked with Ted. I myself was a valuable source of information for him, because at that time I already had experience of working with the old masters, I knew them personally and had worked with them before. I already had an opinion based on the collected material and observations. But he started coming here only after many of them had already left this life. I shared my commentaries and observations. And also…as a child I had lived for a long time in a yurt with my grandmother not far from Teeli, towards Kyzyl-Dag. That was also an important experience for me. It is important that everything that is connected with nomadic culture has to be viewed through the perceptions of somebody who lives in a yurt. A city-dweller, who grew up between four walls, perceives the world in a different way, he can’t hear the sounds of nature like a nomad in his yurt. — But what is it about our music that interests the foreigners, according to your observations? Even for an inexperienced ear, especially at the first hearing, Tuvan music is very unusual. It leaves a very deep impression, that’s how specific it is. Certainly for almost every non-specialist, at the very least this question arises: “What is this? What kind of music is this?” And then, of course, it becomes interesting to figure it out: what is the specificity of the music, what is the singularity, where is the hidden secret. They come to Tuva with the desire to understand this phenomenon. I personally am just barely getting close to solving the secret. I needed many years for it… print
100 1 2 3 4 5 Chimiza Lamajaa, Center of Asia No.32, 2009
Relates news
Scientific Journal about Tuva on the InternetTuvan Scientist Defended Doctorate on Tuvan MusicTuvan Scholar Takes Part in the International Mongolia-Russia ConferenceIgor Koshkendei is Grand-Prix Winner in Khoomei-2002Music Researcher from Tuva Proves Scientifically Originality of Tuvan Music

https://en.tuvaonline.ru/2009/09/07/5200_suzukey.html

THEODORE LEVIN & VALENTINA SUZUKEI: WHERE RIVERS & MOUNTAINS SING/ SOUND MUSIC and NOMADISM IN TUVA AND BEYONG, NEW EDITION

THEODORE LEVIN & VALENTINA SUZUKEI: WHERE RIVERS & MOUNTAINS SING/ SOUND MUSIC and NOMADISM IN TUVA AND BEYONG, NEW EDITION, English language, 281 pages

SUZUKEI VALENTINA & TED LEVIN

Theodore Levin takes readers on a journey through the rich sonic world of inner Asia, where the elemental energies of wind, water, and echo; the ubiquitous presence of birds and animals; and the legendary feats of heroes have inspired a remarkable art and technology of sound-making among nomadic pastoralists. As performers from Tuva and other parts of inner Asia have responded to the growing worldwide popularity of their music, Levin follows them to the West, detailing their efforts to nourish global connections while preserving the power and poignancy of their music traditions.

Biographie de l’auteur

Theodore Levin is Professor of Music at Dartmouth College and author of The Hundred Thousand Fools of God: Musical Travels in Central Asia (and Queens, New York) (IUP, 1997).

Valentina Süzükei is Senior Academic Officer of the Tuvan Institute for Humanities Research in Kyzyl, Tuva. She is author of three books on Tuvan music, including The Musical Culture of Tuva in the Twentieth Century (in Russian).

Deep Trance Mongolian Tuvan Throat Singing | Shamanic Journey | Healing Waves

Deep Trance Mongolian Tuvan Throat Singing | Shamanic Journey | Healing Waves

20,488 views•Dec 7, 2018 4347ShareSaveHealing Waves 1.72K subscribers Hello Beautiful Tribe Member! Deep Trance Mongolian Tuvan Throat Singing Shamanic Journey Healing Waves – Enhance Self Love – Energy Cleanse – Miracle Music Healing. Peaceful, empowering and soothing music and nature footage to nurture your mind, body, and soul. Supporting and empowering you on your life journey. This Tuvan throat singing meditation will help you in going into a meditation deep trance shamanic state, using throat singing chakra healing, you will balance your throat chakra. Music is tuned to 432Hz With Ancient Shamanic Trance elements which help in Synchronizing the right and left hemispheres of the brain, with the Theta Waves and opening a gate into the Sub-conscious mind. Do you want Unique Tuvan Trance Music? The Shaman Within – Shamanic Music Is a 5 Track Album of 5 Hours, that will take you into the Deepest trance state your looking for. https://www.healingwavess.com/collect… ◐ The Power of Sound Vibration ◑ When we dive into the human body, going into our organs, cells, molecules, atoms, and even smaller particles, we find that all that is left is a Vibration, a Wave of movement. We are made of vibration, that’s why Sound Vibration is effecting us so Deeply. When the Sounds from the Meditation Music, come across our Body, they resonate with our Atoms, Cells, Molecules, and Organs, balancing them into their original Frequency and Vibration. as Nikola Tesla said before: “If you want to find the secrets of the Universe, think in terms of energy, frequency, and vibration.” ◐ Shamanic Trance ◑ The word “Trance” comes from the Latin word “Transire” meaning to cross over. The old Shamans used to Cross over to the underworld, where is it you ask yourself? In today’s modern world we know that there is the known meaning the conscious mind and the unknown meaning the unconsciousness mind or the underworld. Another word to Trance state can be Altered states of consciousness, and what exactly does it mean you ask? When we change the brainwaves pattern in our brain from Beta (Daily stressful life) to Alpha (Relaxation) / Theta (Dreaming) / Delta (Deep Dreamless sleep), we change the state of our consciousness and entering into an altered state. In the Trance state, this Meditation Music or Shamanic Music Album will take you, you will change your Brainwaves Patterns, and you may achieve a different state of consciousness, each will suit your inner needs, maybe you need to let go of stress or maybe you need to let go of repressed emotions? you can get into the state you need by just playing this music will practicing your Meditation. ◐ Healing Waves Community ◑ Healing Waves is the understanding that we are all one big family, we all suffer and we all overcome suffering, and we can do it the hard way, each soul on its own, or we can do it the easy way, as one big family, one big community helping each outer on the journey of life. Here in Healing Waves, we understand that while practicing Meditation and Yoga, we are polishing the diamond we are, we are reaching our higher potential, we are using new DNA strings and becoming the best version of ourselves. In Healing Waves we combine the sacred and the profane, we use the latest scientific research on Brainwaves and the effect of music on the human brain. That is how we able to create the most unique Meditation Music for our community practice. Our product collections aimed to aid our community members in practicing different Meditation techniques, gaining better benefits and boosting the experience of your Meditation and Yoga practice. ◐ Join Our Community ◑ Site http://www.HealingWavess.com ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ Blog http://www.healingwavess.com/pages/blog ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ Instagram http://www.instagram.com/healing.wavess ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ Facebook http://www.facebook.com/HealingWavesPage ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ “There is some kind of a sweet innocence in being human—in not having to be just happy or just sad—in the nature of being able to be both broken and whole, at the same time.” – C. JoyBell C. From Deep Within our Soul, From the Bottom of the Heart, We send love to all living creatures. May we all find peace, and compassion in our life. Sefy From Healing Waves ❤

Christopher Bergevin, Chandan Narayan, Joy Williams, Natasha Mhatre, Jennifer KE Steeves, Joshua GW Bernstein,Brad Story / Overtone focusing in biphonic tuvan throat singing

Overtone focusing in biphonic tuvan throat singing

  1. Christopher Bergevin  Is a corresponding author ,
  2. Chandan Narayan,
  3. Joy Williams,
  4. Natasha Mhatre,
  5. Jennifer KE Steeves,
  6. Joshua GW Bernstein,
  7. Brad Story  Is a corresponding author
  1. Physics and Astronomy, York University, Canada;
  2. Centre for Vision Research, York University, Canada;
  3. Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Sciences, Canada;
  4. Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of California, United States;
  5. Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, York University, Canada;
  6. York MRI Facility, York University, Canada;
  7. Biology, Western University, Canada;
  8. Psychology, York University, Canada;
  9. National Military Audiology & Speech Pathology Center, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, United States;
  10. Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, United States

Research Article Feb 12, 2020

Cite as: eLife 2020;9:e50476 doi: 10.7554/eLife.50476

Abstract

Khoomei is a unique singing style originating from the republic of Tuva in central Asia. Singers produce two pitches simultaneously: a booming low-frequency rumble alongside a hovering high-pitched whistle-like tone. The biomechanics of this biphonation are not well-understood. Here, we use sound analysis, dynamic magnetic resonance imaging, and vocal tract modeling to demonstrate how biphonation is achieved by modulating vocal tract morphology. Tuvan singers show remarkable control in shaping their vocal tract to narrowly focus the harmonics (or overtones) emanating from their vocal cords. The biphonic sound is a combination of the fundamental pitch and a focused filter state, which is at the higher pitch (1–2 kHz) and formed by merging two formants, thereby greatly enhancing sound-production in a very narrow frequency range. Most importantly, we demonstrate that this biphonation is a phenomenon arising from linear filtering rather than from a nonlinear source.eLife digest

The republic of Tuva, a remote territory in southern Russia located on the border with Mongolia, is perhaps best known for its vast mountainous geography and the unique cultural practice of “throat singing”. These singers simultaneously create two different pitches: a low-pitched drone, along with a hovering whistle above it. This practice has deep cultural roots and has now been shared more broadly via world music performances and the 1999 documentary Genghis Blues.

Despite many scientists being fascinated by throat singing, it was unclear precisely how throat singers could create two unique pitches. Singing and speaking in general involves making sounds by vibrating the vocal cords found deep in the throat, and then shaping those sounds with the tongue, teeth and lips as they move up the vocal tract and out of the body. Previous studies using static images taken with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested how Tuvan singers might produce the two pitches, but a mechanistic understanding of throat singing was far from complete.

Now, Bergevin et al. have better pinpointed how throat singers can produce their unique sound. The analysis involved high quality audio recordings of three Tuvan singers and dynamic MRI recordings of the movements of one of those singers. The images showed changes in the singer’s vocal tract as they sang inside an MRI scanner, providing key information needed to create a computer model of the process.

This approach revealed that Tuvan singers can create two pitches simultaneously by forming precise constrictions in their vocal tract. One key constriction occurs when tip of the tongue nearly touches a ridge on the roof of the mouth, and a second constriction is formed by the base of the tongue. The computer model helped explain that these two constrictions produce the distinctive sounds of throat singing by selectively amplifying a narrow set of high frequency notes that are made by the vocal cords. Together these discoveries show how very small, targeted movements of the tongue can produce distinctive sounds.Introduction

In the years preceding his death, Richard Feynman had been attempting to visit the small republic of Tuva located in geographic center of Asia (Leighton, 2000). A key catalyst came from Kip Thorne, who had gifted him a record called Melody tuvy, featuring a Tuvan singing in a style known as Khoomei, or Xöömij. Although he was never successful in visiting Tuva, Feynman was nonetheless captivated by Khoomei, which can be best described as a high-pitched tone, similar to a whistle carrying a melody, hovering above a constant booming low-frequency rumble. This is a form of biphonation, or in Feynman’s own words, “a man with two voices”. Khoomei, now a part of the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, is characterized as “the simultaneous performance by one singer of a held pitch in the lower register and a melody … in the higher register” (Aksenov, 1973). How, indeed, does one singer produce two pitches at one time? Even today, the biophysical underpinnings of this biphonic human vocal style are not fully understood.

Normally, when a singer voices a song or speech, their vocal folds vibrate at a fundamental frequency (f0), generating oscillating airflow, forming the so-called source. This vibration is not, however, simply sinusoidal, as it also produces a series of harmonics tones (i.e., integer multiples of f0) (Figure 1). Harmonic frequencies in this sound above f0 are called overtones. Upon emanating from the vocal folds, they are then sculpted by the vocal tract, which acts as a spectral filter. The vocal-tract filter has multiple resonances that accentuate certain clusters of overtones, creating formants. When speaking, we change the shape of our vocal tract to shift formants in systematic ways characteristic of vowel and consonant sounds. Indeed, singing largely uses vowel-like sounds (Story, 2016). In most singing, the listener perceives only a single pitch associated with the f0 of the vocal production, with the formant resonances determining the timbre. Khoomei has two strongly emphasized pitches: a low-pitch drone associated with the f0

, plus a melody carried by variation in the higher frequency formant that can change independently (Kob, 2004). Two possible loci for this biphonic property are the source and/or the filter. Figure 1

Frequency spectra for three different singers transitioning from normal to biphonic singing. Vertical white lines in the spectrograms (left column) indicate the time point for the associated spectrum in the right column. Transition points from normal to biphonic singing state are denoted by …

A source-based explanation could involve different mechanisms, such as two vibrating nonlinear sound sources in the syrinx of birds, which produce multiple notes that are harmonically unrelated (Fee et al., 1998; Zollinger et al., 2008). Humans however are generally considered to have only a single source, the vocal folds. But there are an alternative possibilities: for instance, the source could be nonlinear and produce harmonically-unrelated sounds. For example, aerodynamic instabilities are known to produce biphonation (Mahrt et al., 2016). Further, Khoomei often involves dramatic and sudden transitions from simple tonal singing to biophonation (see Figure 1 and the Appendix for associated audio samples). Such abrupt changes are often considered hallmarks of physiological nonlinearity (Goldberger et al., 2002), and vocal production can generally be nonlinear in nature (Herzel and Reuter, 1996; Mergell and Herzel, 1997; Fitch et al., 2002; Suthers et al., 2006). Therefore it remains possible that biphonation arises from nonlinear source considerations.

Vocal tract shaping, a filter-based framework, provides an alternative explanation for biphonation. In one seminal study of Tuvan throat singing, Levin and Edgerton examined a wide variety of song types and suggested that there were three components at play. The first two (‘tuning a harmonic’ relative to the filter and lengthening the closed phase of the vocal fold vibration) represented a coupling between source and filter. But it was the third, narrowing of the formant, that appeared crucial. Yet, the authors offered little empirical justification for how these effects are produced by the vocal tract shape in the presented radiographs. Thus it remains unclear how the high-pitched formant in Khoomei was formed (Grawunder, 2009). Another study (Adachi and Yamada, 1999) examined a throat singer using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and captured static images of the vocal tract shape during singing. These images were then used in a computational model to produce synthesized song. Adachi and Yamada argued that a “rear cavity” was formed in the vocal tract and its resonance was essential to biphonation. However, their MRI data reveal limited detail since they were static images of singers already in the biphonation state. Small variations in vocal tract geometry can have pronounced effects on produced song (Story et al., 1996) and data from static MRI would reveal little about how and which parts of the vocal tract change shape as the singers transition from simple tonal song to biphonation. To understand which features of vocal tract morphology are crucial to biophonation, a dynamic description of vocal tract morphology would be required.

Here we study the dynamic changes in the vocal tracts of multiple expert practitioners from Tuva as they produce Khoomei. We use MRI to acquire volumetric 3D shape of the vocal tract of a singer during biphonation. Then, we capture the dynamic changes in a midsagittal slice of the vocal tract as singers transition from tonal to biphonic singing while making simultaneous audio recordings of the song. We use these empirical data to guide our use of a computational model, which allows us to gain insight into which features of vocal tract morphology are responsible for the singing phonetics observed during biophonic Khoomei song (e.g., Story, 2016). We focus specifically on the Sygyt (or Sigit) style of Khoomei (Aksenov, 1973).ResultsDiscussionMaterials and methodsAppendix 1ReferencesDecision letterAuthor responseArticle and author informationMetrics

Categories and tags

https://elifesciences.org/articles/50476

JEFF RENAUD: Researchers solve mystery of Tuvan throat singing

Researchers solve mystery of Tuvan throat singing

March 10, 2020 By Jeff Renaud

Paul Mayne // Western NewsWestern Science professor Natasha Mhatre was a member of an international research team that uncoupled the mystery of how Tuvan throat singers produce distinctive sounds in which you can hear two different pitches at once.

An international research team has uncoupled the mystery of how Tuvan throat singers produce distinctive sounds in which you can hear two different pitches at once – a low rumble and a high whistle-like tone.

Fascinated with how this form of throat singing, known as Khoomei, creates this dual tone, researchers from Western, York University and the University of Arizona studied members of the Tuvan performing group Huun Huur Tu to examine first-hand how they do it.

“They can produce two different pitches, which goes against the typical way we think about how speech sounds are produced,” says lead researcher Christopher Bergevin from York’s Faculty of Science. “It was a bit of a mystery how they did it and it’s something researchers have wondered about for the last two decades.”

The researchers found that the Tuvan singers were able to uniquely constrict their vocal tract in two key spots simultaneously – one at the front of their mouth using their tongue and another at the back of their throat. This had the effect of creating the dual sounds.

The paper, Overtone focusing in biphonic Tuvan throat singing, was published in full today in the journal eLife.

To figure out the mechanisms involved, researchers at York, including Bergevin and Chandan Narayan from the Faculty of Liberal Arts, recorded the singers in a sound booth and shot a series of images of one the Tuvan performers singing while in an MRI scanner.

Those images were sent to Western Science professor Natasha Mhatre, who helped reconstruct the vocal tract shape using a 3D-reconstruction software called 3DSlicer. Mhatre is a world-leading expert in acoustic and vibratory communication, predominantly in insects and spiders.

“In bioacoustics, morphology can be very powerful in producing unexpected effects and so imaging and understanding the vocal tract was one of our main goals,” said Mhatre, the Canada Research Chair in Invertebrate Neurobiology.

Special to Western NewsHuun-Huur-Tu are a music group from Tuva, a Russian federative republic situated on the Mongolia–Russia border. The most distinctive characteristic of Huun-Huur-Tu’s music is throat singing, in which the singers sing both the note and the drone’s overtone, thus producing two or three notes simultaneously.

Once the vocal tracts were reconstructed, Brad Story of Arizona’s Speech Acoustics and Physiology Lab, modelled and simulated the singing in all the configurations observed in the vocal tract.

Birds and some frogs can produce multiple distinct tones, but only a very few human singers can, including the Tuvans studied here.

In humans, vocal folds make sound by vibrating creating a buzzing noise. How fast or slow the vocal cords vibrate determines whether a high- or low-pitched sound is produced. The faster they vibrate, the higher the pitch of the voice. But they also produce a series of harmonics or ‘overtones.’ The mouth and tongue shape theses overtones, creating resonances at certain frequencies called formants.

Vowels in human speech are determined by the first three formants – F1, F2 and F3. Each formant is usually distinct, but Tuvan singers can merge multiple formants to create one exceedingly sharpened formant and this forms the higher pitched melody with the lowest formant forming the lower rumbling register. Save as PDF

Altai Kai (Turkic Throat Singing)

Altai Kai (Turkic Throat Singing)

944,783 views•Feb 11, 2017 13K270ShareSaveUngern Sternberg 29K subscribers Really it’s Turkic throat singing in this case, but since they are related steppe cultures I put two songs by Altai Kai (Мой народ/My People and Jебрен кай ла тунур/Ancient Kai Song) alongside a variety of Mongolian inspired imagery. Best viewed full-screen and in 1080p. Note: This is a fan made video and the art and music in this video are not related in any way to myself. Please support the artists by purchasing their original works.

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Song

El-Jonim

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Altai Kai

Album

Altai Throat Singing

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CD Baby (on behalf of Altai Kai)

Song

Ancient Kai Song and Tunur Drum

Artist

Altai Kai

Album

Altai Throat Singing

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Altai Kai II (Turkic Throat Singing)

Altai Kai II (Turkic Throat Singing)

Ungern Sternberg 29K subscribers Two tunes by the group Altai Kai (Кай кожонг and Jерим) set alongside imagery inspired by the various steppe cultures (Turkic, Mongol, etc.) Best viewed full-screen and in 1080p. Note: This is a fan made video and the art and music in this video are not related in any way to myself. Please support the artists by purchasing their original works.

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Song

Kai Kozhong

Artist

Altai Kai

Album

Altai Throat Singing

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CD Baby (on behalf of Altai Kai)

NATHALIE HENRICH-BERNADONI, FRANCE

HENRICH BERNARDONI Nathalie Directrice de Recherche CNRS VulgarisationProjetsPublicationsEnseignementEncadrementRechercheCV Accueil Bienvenue sur ma page professionnelle !

Qui suis-je ?

Je suis Directrice de Recherche au CNRS, rattachée à l’Institut des Sciences Humaines et Sociales du CNRS (INSHS – CNRS).

Mes recherches scientifiques explorent la voix humaine à travers une approche pluridisciplinaire : phonétique expérimentale et clinique, vocologie, physiologie de l’instrument vocal humain, biomécanique du larynx et des plis vocaux, physique des interactions fluide-structure-acoustique au sein du conduit vocal, traitement du signal de parole ou de chant, analyse de la voix et synthèse, voix et respiration, ethnomusicologie. Elles s’articulent autour de plusieurs thématiques :

  1. le développement d’outils et de technologies pour la mesure physique, l’analyse et la synthèse vocale;
  2. l’observation et la description du comportement vocal dans la parole et dans le chant ;
  3. la modélisation de la production vocale humaine (du point de vue de la physique et du point de vue du signal);
  4. l’étude des usages de la voix chantée pour l’apprentissage, le bien-être, la rééducation et la santé vocale.

Concernant la voix chantée, je me suis intéressée au chant savant occidental de l’adulte, aux styles dans les Musiques Amplifiées Actuelles, aux styles et techniques vocales à travers le monde (chant bulgare féminin, chant polyphonique traditionnel de Sardaigne, chant hoomii mongol, Tahrir iranien, yodel) et au Human Beatbox.

Quand notre voix s’exprime …

La voix est au cœur des interactions sociales humaines. Elle est parole, murmure, chant, cri et chuchotement. Elle s’exprime, et elle exprime. Elle reflète nos émotions, nos humeurs, notre personnalité. Outil de travail pour un tiers des actifs, elle est aussi un instrument de musique unique et offert à tous, transportable et modulable. De quoi notre voix est-elle capable ?
Venez le découvrir à travers la conférence “Quand notre voix s’exprime …” donnée à l’occasion des Mardis de l’Espace des sciences à Rennes.   

Chercheur en Sciences de la Voix ?

Vous vous questionnez sur le métier de chercheur, sur ce que nous étudions sur la voix humaine ? Voici une vidéo faite à l’occasion de la remise de Médaille de bronze du CNRS en Octobre 2013. Elle vous donnera un aperçu de mes recherches

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Découvrez la Voix Chantée, entre sciences et pratiques !

Un ouvrage collectif vient de paraître chez De Boeck sur le thème de la voix chantée, dans la collection Solal “Voix Parole Langage”. Des scientifiques de disciplines variées, un médecin ORL phoniatre, un physiologiste et orthophoniste, des professeurs de chant partagent leurs connaissances et leurs points de vue sur notre instrument de musique et de communication.

Actualités sur les Sciences de la Voix en France

  • Rendez-vous sur le carnet de recherche “Sciences et Voix”, animé par la communauté scientifique sur la Voix en France: http://voix.hypotheses.org
    Vous y trouverez les informations actuelles sur les conférences, ateliers, les thèses, mémoires d’orthophonie et stages, des résumés d’articles, et toute autre information en lien avec les Sciences de la Voix.
  • Les Atelier Sciences et Voix (ASV) ont eu lieu tous les mois sur Grenoble de 2012 à 2018. Vous pouvez retrouver l’ensemble des Ateliers podcastés sur la Chaîne YouTube des Ateliers Sciences et Voix
  • La Journée Mondiale de la Voix a lieu le 16 Avril. Retrouvez les événements en lien avec cette journée sur la page FaceBook nationale et sur le site mondial