Alas! – Stuart Hinds

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Alas! – Stuart Hinds

Alas! – Stuart Hinds

254 views•Jun 3, 2017 50ShareSaveTheStuartHinds 81 subscribers Patrick Moore – cello Stuart Hinds – overtone singing performed at St. Thomas University, 9.29.16 The inspiration for Alas! came from the lute songs of John Dowland. Even though there are no lyrics, the emotional content and polyphonic style are similar to Dowland’s. The piece was originally composed for voice and bassoon and has also been performed with bass clarinet, but this performance was given with cello.

Overtone Choir Spektrum – Ahimsa (Baird Hersey & PRANA)

Overtone Choir Spektrum – Ahimsa (Baird Hersey & PRANA)

144 views•Dec 30, 2016 20ShareSaveOvertone Choir Spektrum 70 subscribers Overtone Choir Spektrum (Prague, Czech Republic) Conductor: Jan Stanek CD Villarosa (2009) Published: Alikvotní sbor Spektrum, copyright 2009, AS 001-2 All rights reserved (OSA)

Overtone Choir Spektrum – Chaconne (Stuart Hinds)

Overtone Choir Spektrum – Chaconne (Stuart Hinds)

691 views•Oct 26, 2015 50ShareSaveOvertone Choir Spektrum 70 subscribers Overtone Choir Spektrum (Prague, Czech Republic) Conductor: Jan Stanek CD Paian (2015) Published: Alikvotní sbor Spektrum, copyright 2015, AS 002-2 All rights reserved (OSA)

JEAN FRANCOIS CASTELL: Cursus de chant diphonique à l’IIMM – Institut International des Musiques du Monde à Aubagne dès la rentrée prochaine avec #johannicurtet (octobre 2020) – master class Batsuh Dorj (avril 2021) !

Cursus de chant diphonique à l’IIMM – Institut International des Musiques du Monde à Aubagne dès la rentrée prochaine avec #johannicurtet – master class Batsuh Dorj !

Grande nouvelle! Ouverture d’un cursus de khöömii à l’IIMM – Institut International des Musiques du Monde à Aubagne dès la rentrée prochaine! L’enseignement sera principalement assuré par Johanni Curtet, accompagné ponctuellement de musiciens mongol ou touva.

Pour découvrir le khöömii mongol ou touva, 2 stages inscrits dans le cursus et ouverts à tous sont proposés: l’un avec Johanni Curtet en octobre 2020 et l’autre avec le soliste touva Batsükh Dorj en avril 2021!

Informations: https://iimm.fr/se_former/

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Great news! Opening of a khöömii class at IIMM – Institut International des Musiques du Monde, Aubagne, France, from next October! The teaching will be mainly provided by Johanni Curtet, punctually accompanied by Mongolian or Tuvan musicians.

To discover the Mongolian or Tuvan khöömii, 2 workshops included in the curriculum and open to everyone are open: one with Johanni Curtet in October 2020 and the other with the Tuvan soloist Batsükh Dorj in April 2021!

Informations: https://iimm.fr/en/training-2/

SVEN GRAWUNDER : ON THE PHYSIOLOGY OF VOICE PRODUCTION IN SOUTH-SIBERIAN THROAT SINGING

Analysis of Acoustic and Electrophysiological Evidences

On the Physiology of Voice Production in South-Siberian …books.google.fr › booksTraduire cette pageOvertone singing – perception, physical modeling of sygyt, kargyraa and … Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, l(3):227-244. van den Berg, J. (1960).Sven Grawunder

Anna Liesowska & Derek: Secrets of throat singing revealed by scientific research into the unusual sounds

Secrets of throat singing revealed by scientific research into the unusual sounds

By Anna Liesowska & Derek Lambie 22 December 2014

Unique physiology of people in Altai mountain region means only they can perform the melodies that date back centuries.

Shor female shaman performs the rite. Picture: Maxim Kiselyov

It is a unique and distinctive form of singing only found in one small part of the world. Now scientific research has finally discovered why the unusual sounds of throat singing have never spread out from the isolated steppes of the Altai and Sayan mountains.

Simply put, the people of Tuva and southern Siberia have different vocal cords to the rest of the planet and are the only ones with the capability to master the art.

Experts from the Institute of Philology, at the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, have found that Turks’ vocal cords are slightly wider and the larynx is not as extended, allowing them to make the unique sounds required.

Throat singing produces a unique pitch and sound that comes from deep within the throat and it is said to date back centuries.

Throat singing secrets

Throat singing secrets

Tuvan singer Choduraa Tumat. Altai boy playing khomus. Pictures: Tuva Online, Altai Komus

According to a March 2006 edition of Newsweek magazine, throat singing is described as coming from a ‘human bagpipe, a person who could sing a sustained low note while humming an eerie whistle-like melody’.

The article added: ‘For good measure, toss in a thrumming rhythm similar to that of a jaw harp, but produced vocally by the same person, at the same time.’

It is thought that it originated from Mongolian men who utilised the wide open landscape to make the sounds carry a great distance. Indeed, singers often travel far into the countryside looking for the right river or mountainside in which to create the proper environment.

Over time it now looks as if the way the singing was performed altered the physiology of the throats of people living in the Altai region.

Two residents of the Tashtagolsky district, in Kemerovo, took part in the Institute of Philogy research in Novosibirsk using modern methods to study the physiology of their speech.

Both TV journalist Raisa Sanzhenakova and culture worker Maria Idigesheva, who is head of the Taglyk Shor public organisation, are excellent native speakers of Turkic Shor. The language is spoken by only about 2,800 people in the Kemerovo province in south central Siberia, with many of its roots borrowed from Mongolian.

The experiment was filmed and a documentary on the results will be broadcast in January on local television.

However, one of the main conclusions is that the different throats of the people in the region help them to make the distinctive sounds in a way that people in Europe, for instance, would be unable to.

Throat singing secrets

Throat singing secrets

Shor music group ‘Ot Ene’. Maria Idigesheva, head of the Taglyk Shor public organisation. Pictures: r-19.ru, Maria Idigesheva

Raisa Sanzhenakova said: ‘For three days we talked with Novosibirsk scientists. Our speech using the Shor language was recorded with special equipment and was examined for the articular parameters of speech.

‘Digital radiography and magnetic resonance imaging studied our vocal apparatus and brain.’

The research took place in the laboratory of experimental phonetic studies, which was established in the late 1960s and is the only one of its kinds in Russia.

Since its creation, researchers have described the phonetics and phonology of more than 40 languages, dialects and sub-dialects.

https://siberiantimes.com/science/others/news/0070-secrets-of-throat-singing-revealed-by-scientific-research-into-the-unusual-sounds/

Spacedrum | Morin Khuur | Chant diphonique

Spacedrum | Morin Khuur | Chant diphonique

4,888 views•Jan 15, 2020 2261ShareSaveNaïa 436 subscribers Titre : Dundgoviin Magtaal. Clip réalisé par Robert Luqués. Avec Mandaakhai Daansuren : Morin Khuur, Chant diphonique et Jean-Noël Godard : Spacedrum, Udu. Merci à Metalsound pour le Spacedrum.

7 idées reçues sur le CHANT DIPHONIQUE ou harmonique par Iannis Psallidakos

7 idées reçues sur le CHANT DIPHONIQUE ou harmonique par Iannis Psallidakos

Iannis Psallidakos 244 subscribers Les idées reçues:

– Le chant diphonique est un chant mongol, réservé aux hommes.

– Il s’agit d’une pratique spirituelle de guérison que les chamans utilisent depuis la nuit des temps.

– Le chant diphonique est plutôt un chant harmonique.

– Pour le pratiquer il faut que tu apprennes à créer une deuxième note dans ta voix, à coller ta – langue sur le palais, à respirer par le ventre et à pousser fort sur le larynx !

– Il est incroyablement difficile de diphoner !

En fait NON, la réalité n’est pas tout à fait celle-là. Je t’ai préparé cette vidéo pour répondre à ces 7 idées reçues et essayer de mettre un peu de lumière sur cette pratique extraordinaire, le chant diphonique! Si tu veux voir plus des vidéos comme celle-là, abonne-toi à ma chaîne. Si tu veux apprendre le chant diphonique même à distance (par visioconférence) contacte-moi: osersavoix.fr Iannis Psallidakos

University Of Arizona Tuvan Throat Singing Study

University Of Arizona Tuvan Throat Singing Study

202 views•Mar 27, 2020 100ShareSaveKJZZ Phoenix 794 subscribers Researchers at the University of Arizona use MRI scans to solve the mystery of how Tuvan throat singers are able to produce what sounds like two different pitches at the same time.