Hefele, Anna-Maria; Eklund, Robert; McAllister, Anita: Polyphonic overtone singing: An acoustic and physiological (MRI) analysis and a first-person description of a unique mode of singing

June 10, 2019 Conference paper Open Access

Polyphonic overtone singing: An acoustic and physiological (MRI) analysis and a first-person description of a unique mode of singing

Anna Maria Hefele

Proceedings from FONETIK 2019 Stockholm, June 10–12, 2019

Polyphonic Overtone Singing: an acoustic and physio-logical (MRI) analysis and a first -person description of a unique mode of singing

Anna-Maria Hefele1, Robert Eklund2, Anita McAllister3

1 http://www.anna-maria-hefele.com

2 Department of Culture and Communication, Linköping University, Sweden

3 Division of Speech and Language Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

ama@anna-maria-hefele.com, robert@roberteklund.info, anita.mcallister@ki.se

Abstract This paper describes a unique singing mode, tentatively labeled “polyphonic overtone singing”. In overtone singing the vocal harmonics of a stabile fundamental frequency are filtered by the singer in such a way that specific upper harmonics are amplified, and heard clear ly, as a second musical voice. In the “throat singing” of Tuva (Mongolia) moving overtones usually occur over a stable drone. In polyphonic overtone singing not only the pitch of the overtones are changed and moving, but also the fundamental which results in two-voice singing.

Introduction

The historical records of overtone sing-ing (OTS) are fairly scarce. It is used in different ethnic traditions and musical styles. A well -known example is the “Tuvan throat-singing” (Levin & Edger-ton, 1999), which mainly occurs in Mongolia and Tibetan temples (Smith, Stevens & Tomlinson, 1967). Singers in these regions employ a variety of throat-singing styles, referred to as sygyt, chöömej and kargyraa (Grawunder, 1999:22). Chöömej is also used as an umbrella term for all central Asian techniques. In the west, the tradition of OT is not as strong, and the development of the technique began during the last century.

The earliest existing recording of western OTS is from 1929, sung by an Amer-ican country singer, Arthur Miles. However, Miles did not leave any marked traces in musical history, although he was a local celebrity and even released an album (Tongeren, 2004:161). Also in America, La Monte Young began to experiment with vocal overtones and started to use it as a musical parameter, although it was not yet mature overtone singing (Tongeren, 2004:166).

In 1968 Karlheinz Stockhausen published Stimmung for six vocalists, which can be considered the first composition in contemporary music with exact, notated vocal overtones, amplified through specific vowels (Saus, 2009:1).

Further, Michael Vetter (Germany), who collaborated with Stockhausen from 1969 (Tongeren, 2004:177), and David Hykes “laid the solid foundations for overtone singing as an independent vocal technique /…/ With their original examples, overtone singing became an art in itself” (Tongeren, 2004:175).

The Greek singer Demetrio Stratos (1945–1979) also belongs to the first generation of experimental western overtone singers, and before his early death he left his album Cantare la Voce(1978) with “vocal sounding overtone noises” (Tongeren, 2004:175).

Trân Quang Hai (1944–), a Vietnamese musician and researcher living in Paris, got in contact with Mongol overtone singing in 1969 and he “collaborated in one of the first compositions and public performances of OTS in Europe after Stockhausen .

Apart from his activities as a performer, Trân’s main contribution to the field of overtone singing are scientific and educational” (Tongeren, 2004:171).

From 1983 and on OTS became popular also outside the field of experi-mental music and the knowledge about the technique grew. Singing groups and overtone choirs were formed for chanting, singing mantras or practicing overtone singing together, so it was not only performed by professional musicians (Tongeren, 2004:185). So called “World Music” gained popularity in the west, which spurred an interested in overtone singing. Also enhanced by the Tuva Ensemble tours (Tongeren, 2004:187). To-day western overtone singing is used in many different musical genres. From a phonetic perspective, the formant tuning and the adjustments of the articulators during OTS, are of interest both with regard to aspects related to production and pedagogy.

Method and material

The study includes acoustic analysis of OTS performed by the first author (AMH in the following). In all spectrograms the program Overtone Analyzer(https://www.sygyt.com/en) was used.

The MRI recordings were made at Freiburg University Hospital, usinga 3T Siemens Prisma Fit scanner. MRI recordings were completed in collaboration with professor Bernhard Richter, Dr Michael Burdumy and the singer at an earlier date. The MRI-illustrations are provided by the singer AMH. The singerAMH is a classically trained soprano with a wide frequency range of around ~100–2000 Hz. She started with overtone singing in 2005 and now cooperates with several musicians and composers to increase knowledge about the musical possibilities of the technique. AMH is also teaching overtone singing in masterclasses around the world.

The techniques

In the western style of overtone singing a distinction can be made between the so-called one- cavity-technique, where harmonics get amplified through specific vowel shapes and the so-called two -cavity-technique, where the tongue is raised and divides the oral cavity into two resonance chambers. This results in very clear, whistle-like harmonics. The differentiation between these two tech-niques was first performed by the ethno-musicologists Tran Quang Hai and Hugo Zemp, based on physiological research (Jentsch 2007:55). The one-cavity technique enhances the harmonics through changing the vowel shapes, mostly over a stabile fundamental. This is usually the first technical stage to learn in OTS.

Results

Below different possibilities with OTS are explored. As seen in the spectrogram in Figure 1, overtones can be clearly visualized over a stabile fundamental. Note that a drone would have the same func-tion. Below the spectrogram the simulta-neous MRI registrations are shown. Also note the different and peculiar tongue shapes used to enhance the partials. This is especially apparent in the initial frames. The technique used for this anal-ysis is the two-cavity technique. Another possibility within the two-cavity technique is to move overtone and fundamental in parallel, or to leave the harmonics stabile and move the fundamental through the subharmonic series as shown in Figure 2.By alternating the fundamental frequency different overtones can be enhanced as shown in Figure 3. Here two alternating fundamentals and their harmonics are combined using the two-cavity technique.

Proceedings from FONETIK 2019 Stockholm, June 10–12, 201992Figure 1. Harmonics 4-10 amplified in the two-cavity technique from fundamental C4. Figure 2. A stable harmonic and a moving fundamental.Figure 3. Overtones over two alternating fundamentals.In Figure 4 AMH illustrates how overtones and fundamentals can be moved in opposite directions. This results in creating a musical counterpoint.Thus, simple classical songs or folk melodies can be easily arranged for OTS. In Figure 5 the spectrogram of the first phrase of “Sehnsucht nach dem Frühlinge” by W.A. Mozart is shown. The fundamental is not moved randomly but rather chosen within the overtone- and subharmonic series and within the singer’s voice range. Within these options harmonics are chosen that deliver a harmony or create a counterpoint move-ment. This provides a harmonic context to the melody in OT. Figure 4. Fundamental and overtones moving in opposite directions, resulting in a musical counterpoint.To result in polyphonic overtone singing, different combinations of movements for overtones and fundamentals are used. In the figure three combinations of movements for the overtones and the fundamentals are displayed.Proceedings from FONETIK 2019 Stockholm, June 10–12, 201993Figure 5. Three combinations of movements for overtones and fundamentals are shown. In this example it is the first phrase of “Sehnsucht nach dem Frühlinge” by W.A. Mozart.The physiology of overtone singing .In the one-cavity-technique the vowel transition between /i/ and /u/ is used, as in the slowly spoken words “oui” and “you”. Here only the movement of the second formant is enhancing harmonics, see Figure 6. In the second panel of the figure the same movement was executed but while whispering, to illustrate the ef-fects of the vocal tract.In the two-cavity technique the ele-vation and shape of the tongue creates two separate resonatory chambers. The tongue shape is similar to a / l/ or / ɹ /. The third formant is lowered and brought close to the second by a raised tongue. The 2nd and 3rd formant are coordinated and moved through the spectrum almost at the same frequency (Saus, 2016:450), amplifying the same harmonic. Also the impact of other formants is lowered.In both techniques, the first formantis kept low to improve control and pro-vide a larger range of options in the har-monic scale. In overtone singing melo-dies are created by formant tuning, pri-marily involving the second and third formant (F2, F3). The shape and eleva-tion of the tongue, jaw position, lip rounding and spreading plays key roles in this process. Figure 6. To the left overtones and f0 is shown while moving from /i/ to /u/ in one-cavity technique. To the right the same movement from /i/ to /u/ while whispering, illustrating filtering of the vocal tract.Discussion In the present study OTS produced by one singer using two techniques was an-alysed. Previously the enhancement of harmonics has been attributed to a nar-rowing of pharynx and the velar constriction, adjusting the mouth opening and a tuning of F1 and F2 (Klingholz 1993). In this study we showed that the formant tuning mainly involves F2 and F3 and that several other alterations are involved, such as tongue elevation and shape, lips and jaw position. Also the alterations differ depending on whether a one- or a two-cavity technique was used. Thus, OTS requires precision and timing of the motor control of the articulators and a very accurate pitch perception.

OT singing: A first-person account

When learning OTS , one learns to perceive harmonics as musical notes or pitches, while they are usually perceived as timbre or different vowels. This also leads to a more detailed perception of timbre and vowels, which is useful while learning other singing techniques or working with other singers. An improved perception and more precise control of your sound can lead toincreased blending and enhanced intona-tion. Learning overtone singing increases the ability to control the first 3 formants precisely and autonomously. This could be a useful ability also in Proceedings from FONETIK 2019 Stockholm, June 10–12, 201994other singing techniques in order to improve specific resonance strategies.

In polyphonic overtone singing not only the harmonics but also the funda-mental is moved within the musical con-text to enlarge the musical possibilities of the technique.When overtones and fundamentals are moved simultaneously a very specific coordination is required. The clos-est analogy for me (AMH) as a singer is that of “juggling”.

On terminology – what to call it

On the note of terminology the term “polyphonic overtone singing” has been questioned, e.g. by Maxfield and Titze (2015:470), who write: “Ms. Hefele dubs her technique “polyphonic over-tone singing.” In reality, like most over-tone singers, she selectively amplifies overtones to create a melody above a rel-atively stable fundamental frequency (F0). While her F0 does move, it may be questioned whether its movement rise to the level of an independent melody. As such, calling her technique “polyphony” – a musical style with its own rich history – might be a stretch. Stuart Hinds (2005) points out that he and other overtone singers are indeed capable of a style of overtone singing that could justifiably be called polyphonic, but this practice seems to be an extension of the style and not the most common practice”. Ethnomusicologist Carole Pegg notes that English terms for the practice include “biphonic singing,” “split-tone singing,” “Jew’s harp voice,” and “throat sing-ing.” French terms are no less varied, including “chant diphonique,” “voix dé-doublée,” and “voix guimbarde”.While it is (trivially) true that the set of upper harmonics are defined by the fundamental frequency, this does not completely rule out the use of the word “polyphony”. Although composers such as Palestrina (c1525–1594) were free, in theory, to put in any note in the upper voices, he most surely would never had considered going outside of the “true harmony”, making the end result similar to AMH’s singing. Palestrina was considered the “golden standard” of polyphony during his lifetime. This links to the second argumentagainst the term, that the singing tech-nique used by Hefele is not true polyph-ony, since “poly-” means “many”, and OTS can only produce two separate voices (Maxfield and Titze 2015:470).This argument has more merit since many languages make use of a “one, two, many” (singular, dual, plural) grammar. However, the suggested terms “biphonic singing” or “chant diphonique”, while technically accurate, might be somewhat misleading since “biphonic(al)” or the more commonly used term diplophonic phonation is well established in pathological voice production (e.g. Colton, Casper, Leonard, 2011) commonly referring to abnormal vocal fold vibrational patterns (Sveç, 2000) sometimes also including the ventricular folds (Maryn, De Bodt, Van Cauwenberge 2003). The term is also used to describe animal vocalizations (Wilden et al. 1998; Volodin & Vo-lodina, 2012), where it is a common ine.g. African Wild Dogs (Lycaon pictus) and dholes (Cuon alpinus). Also, and perhaps more importantly, biphonation implies that the sound source are the vo-cal folds vibrating at different frequen-cies or irregularly. This, of course, is very far from the precise control of the fundamental and the harmonics Hefele, and other OT singers use to create their two -part singing.It is evident that OTS, as performed by AMH, is distinct from Tuva throat-singing but what term best describes it is not entirely clear.Overtone singing as a pedagogical tool

Although interesting in and by itself, OTS can also be used in the teaching of general phonetics and acoustic analysis, as tested for years by the second author (RE). Very often it is difficult to make students understand both that there are Proceedings from FONETIK 2019 Stockholm, June 10–12, 201995


For the comple article, click on the link below:

https://zenodo.org/record/3246011



WIKIPEDIA : Anna-Maria Hefele

Anna-Maria Hefele

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Anna-Maria Hefele at INNtöne Jazzfestival 2019

Anna-Maria Hefele at Black Forest Voices fetival 2019

Anna-Maria Hefele is a German overtone singer. Hefele is from Grafing near Munich.[1]

This technique of singing polyphonic overtones is also known as “throat singing,” and Hefele has been practicing it since 2005.[2]

There are several styles of overtone singing found around the world. Canadian Inuit and several forms displayed in Mongolia and surrounding regions are the most recognized. Hefele’s style is culturally practiced in the Siberian region of Tuva. This whistling vocal version is called sygyt.[3]

The Huffington Post has commented on her “amazing ability” and her singing being “utterly bizarre”.[4] On 10 October 2014, she was number two on The Guardian’s Viral Video Chart,[5] with one online video titled Polyphonic Overtone Singing, which features Hefele as she demonstrates and explains overtones. As of October 2019, this video has received more than 14 million hits.

References

“Obertonsängerin Anna-Maria Hefele Eine Stimme wie nicht von dieser Welt”. Br.de. Archived from the original on 12 October 2014. Retrieved 12 October 2014. Fitzharris, Mia. “Throat Singer’s Performance Goes Viral”. Yahoo News. Retrieved 12 October 2014. Christopher Hooton (6 October 2014). This woman singing multiple notes at once is a total ‘I didn’t even know humans could do that’ moment. The Independent. Accessed October 2014. “German Musician Anna-Maria Hefele Demonstrates Polyphonic Overtone Singing, And It’s Amazing”. Huffington Post. Retrieved 12 October 2014.

  1. Perraudin, Frances (10 October 2014). “Viral Video Chart”. The Guardian. Retrieved 12 October 2014.

External links

Authority control GND: 1124113053 MusicBrainz: 9949d133-f1de-467e-b746-4d73d7db351d VIAF: 29148570527924311549 WorldCat Identities (via VIAF): 29148570527924311549

This page was last edited on 29 October 2019, at 03:15 (UTC).
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna-Maria_Hefele

ANNA MARIA HEFELE & TRAN QUANG HAI participate in the UMBRIA IN VOCE 5 , GUBBIO, ITALY, 3-10 NOVEMBER 2019

Sabato 9 novembre 2019

SALA ATTIVITA’ BIBLIOTECA

Ore 13:30 – 18:30
“Overtune singing e canto difonico”
Laboratorio con Tran Quang Hai

tran quang hai

the workshop with Tran Quang Hai which is full

il laboratorio con Tran Quang Hai che è al completo  

REFETTORIO BIBLIOTECA

Ore 21:30

“Longing”
Anna-Maria Hefele in concerto.
Voce e arpa

ANNA MARIA HEFELE
TRAN QUANG HAI

Torna a Gubbio dal 3 al 10 novembre il festival Umbria in Voce, “festa della voce” unica nel suo genere che quest’anno giunge alla sua V edizione con un cartellone artistico di altissimo livello, grazie alla presenza di artisti internazionali e molteplici eventi aperti a tutti, tra cui concerti, conferenze, seminari, laboratori e presentazioni.
Organizzato dall’Associazione Archè con il sostegno del Comune di Gubbio e in collaborazione con un gruppo di cittadini volontari, il Festival è stato ideato dalla cantante e performer Claudia Fofi che ne cura la direzione artistica, e ha ospitato negli anni grandi artisti della voce e della parola come John De Leo, Franco Arminio, Albert Hera, Mauro Tiberi, Keba Sech e Marta Raviglia.
Unica nel suo genere, la manifestazione apre al pubblico e ai suoi partecipanti la possibilità di sperimentare nuovi linguaggi e di creare un luogo di incontro fisico e di gioia genuina tra le persone: funzione che un tempo era svolta dal canto popolare o di tradizione orale e chevuole essere attualizzata creando delle “comunità cantanti” in cui le persone si incontrano per vivere delle occasioni formative di altissimo livello, sempre aperte a tutti e non per specialisti.
Un evento che diviene dunque propulsore sociale, attivatore di relazioni, creatore di benessere immateriale.
Location d’eccezione, le Sale dell’ex Refettorio di una delle biblioteche più antiche d’Italia: la Biblioteca Sperelliana, uno dei tanti patrimoni artistici dell’incantevole città di Gubbio.

Il programma della V edizione si conferma denso di appuntamenti d’eccellenza e si pregia anzitutto di due importanti presenze di alto livello internazionale, che incarnano la dedica del festival al grande artista e sperimentatore della voce Demetrio Stratos, di cui quest’anno ricorre il quarantennale dalla scomparsa.
Primo tra gli ospiti, il vietnamita Tran Quang Hai, il più grande esperto e maestro al mondo del canto difonico: una tecnica vocale di origine sciamanica diffusa in Mongolia, in Siberia e in Sudafrica che ha introdotto nella musica contemporanea ricevendo molti riconoscimenti internazionali. Raffinato interprete delle tradizioni musicali dell’Estremo Oriente, è stato maestro di artisti come Demetrio Stratos,  e dal 1968 fa parte del gruppo di ricerca del CNRS, dipartimento di musicologia presso il Musée de l’Homme di Parigi. Sabato 9 novembre alle 13.30 sarà protagonista del seminario “Overtune singing e canto difonico”, della durata di 5 ore (info: umbriainvoce@gmail.com).

TRAN QUANG HAI

Altro ospite attesissimo è il fenomeno musicale Anna Maria Hefele: cantante, polistrumentista e compositrice tedesca, protagonista del video virale “Polyphonic Overtone Singing”. Il suo è un canto che si muove tra diverse tecniche – dalla musica classica al canto armonico – accompagnandosi con strumenti inusuali come l’arpa e la fascinosa e ipnotica nyckelharpa svedese. Per Umbria in Voce sarà protagonista sabato 9 novembre alle 21.30 del concerto “Longing” per arpa e voce, presentando la sua versatilità vocale in un “solo” che pochi cantanti al mondo possono affrontare con disinvoltura e vera bravura: dal folklore scandinavo e italiano del XVI secolo a Brian Eno, passando per composizioni originali in un unico viaggio che porta il pubblico in un mondo misterioso in cui il virtuosismo è al servizio della partecipazione emotiva e del mondo etereo e sognante di questa magnifica artista.

CONTATTI
www.umbriainvoce.it
Info e prenotazioni concerti e seminari: tel 334.9843087 – 339.4076156  email umbriainvoce@gmail.com
Ufficio Stampa Festival: Fiorenza Gherardi De Candei – tel. 328.1743236  email info@fiorenzagherardi.com

ENGLISH TRANSLATION

The program of the V edition confirms itself to be full of excellent events and first of all has the honor of two important presences of high international level, which embody the dedication of the festival to the great artist and experimenter of the voice Demetrio Stratos, of which this year mEarks the forty year since disappearance.

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TRAN QUANG HAI


First among the guests, the Vietnamese Tran Quang Hai, the greatest expert and master in the world of difonic singing: a vocal technique of shamanic origin widespread in Mongolia, Siberia and South Africa which he introduced into contemporary music receiving many international awards. Refined interpreter of the musical traditions of the Far East, he was a master of artists such as Demetrio Stratos, and since 1968 he is part of the research group of the CNRS, department of musicology at the Musée de l’Homme in Paris. Saturday 9 November at 13.30 will be the protagonist of the seminar “Overtone singing and singing difonico”, lasting 5 hours (info: umbriainvoce@gmail.com).

ANNA MARIA HEFELE

Another highly anticipated guest is the musical phenomenon Anna Maria Hefele: singer, multi-instrumentalist and German composer, protagonist of the viral video “Polyphonic Overtone Singing”. His is a song that moves between different techniques – from classical music to harmonic singing – accompanied by unusual instruments such as the harp and the fascinating and hypnotic Swedish nyckelharpa. For Umbria in Voce it will be the protagonist on Saturday November 9th at 9.30pm of the “Longing” concert for harp and voice, presenting its vocal versatility in a “solo” that few singers in the world can face with ease and true skill: from Scandinavian and Italian folklore of 16th century to Brian Eno, passing through original compositions in a single journey that takes the public into a mysterious world where virtuosity is at the service of emotional participation and the ethereal and dreamy world of this magnificent artist.

TRAN QUANG HAI & ANNA MARIA HEFELE
TRAN QUANG HAI & ANNA MARIA HEFELE

Poster and Programme of the festival UMBRIA IN VOCE (3-10 november 2019), Umbria, Italy / Anna Maria HEFELE and TRAN Quang Hai will perform on 9th November 2019

poster of umbria in voce november.jpg

🙆🏼‍♀️ Solo alcuni dei volti di Umbria in Voce 2019!
Ti aspettiamo dal 3 al 10 novembre a Gubbio.
Scopri il programma completo

http://umbriainvoce.it/

Umbria in voce

Carissimi amici della voce, della poesia, delle cose belle,  siamo felici di presentarvi il programma della quinta edizione del Festival Umbria in voce, che si svolge come sempre a Gubbio nella sala dell’Ex Refettorio della Biblioteca Comunale. Uno spazio accogliente, che per tre giorni si trasforma in una casa della voce umana. Come sempre si può partecipare al singolo evento oppure decidere di viversi tutta l’esperienza e con l’occasione (per chi viene da fuori) visitare la nostra bella città.

Umbria in voce è una festa della voce. E’ il nostro sogno di far tornare le persone al canto spontaneo, perchè nella nostra società si canta troppo poco e “si subisce” il canto in modo passivo. Unico nel suo genere, mette il pubblico al centro dell’esperienza artistica, partendo dal presupposto che cantare fa bene, che in questa società si canta pochissimo e che il frutto immediato del canto è la gioia. La funzione che un tempo era svolta dal canto popolare o di tradizione orale vuole essere attualizzata creando una “Comunità cantante”, in cui le persone si incontrano per vivere delle occasioni formative di altissimo livello, sempre aperte a tutti e non per specialisti. Si vuole creare un luogo sospeso, tra le mura di un’antica città, in cui donare la propria voce, intrecciarla a quella degli altri, farsi guidare in mondi nuovi, incontrare persone, accogliere e accogliersi.

Umbria in voce è un festival patrocinato dalla SIAF e rilascia 50 crediti formativi ecp.


ANTEPRIMA
UIV E IL SOCIALE

Domenica 3 novembre
“CorsiaIncanto”
Portiamo il canto nel reparto pediatria dell’ospedale Gubbio-Gualdo Tadino. A cura delle volontarie canterine di Umbria in Voce

Giovedì 7 novembre

Ore 15:00 – 16:00
“Favolando”
Letture per gli anziani della casa di cura
con Carmela de Marte

Ore 17:00 -18:00
“Vedi come canto?”
Laboratorio di artiterapie integrate per bambini e bambine dai 6 ai 10 anni
Con Francesca Nicchi, Giulia Nardi e Claudia Fofi
In collaborazione con l’associazione Dis e dintorni

Venerdì 8 novembre

Ore 11:45 – 13:30
Body meets voice”. Body music e musica circolare
Laboratorio all’ IIS Cassata Gattapone
con Stefano Baroni

REFETTORIO BIBLIOTECA

Ore 17:30

Conferenza
Essere voce- Demetrio Stratos e i confini della voce umana

Giovanni Palombini – Etnomusicologo Univ. Perugia
Raniero Regni – Pedagogista presso Univ. Lumsa, Roma
Claudia Fofi – direttrice artistica Umbria in voce
Enrico Tribbioli – giornalista
Moreno Barboni – docente di Teoria e metodo dei mass media all’Accademia di Belle Arti di Perugia
Giuseppe Sterparelli – Regista e documentarista

Ore 20:00 Cena nel Centro Sociale Anziani

Ore 21:00
Voci irregolari, la storia di un jazzista italiano tutto da scoprire.
Presentazione del libro “Roberto Nicolosi, una grande del jazz”, di Paolo Ceccarelli, con Sara Jane Ceccarelli, Andrea Angeloni e il professor Alfredo Gasponi, critico musicale

A seguire

“Di voce in voce”
A cura del collettivo Bauxite
Un palco dove poter mettere la voce, un invito a esprimersi.
Poesia, canto, scrittura, declamazione, arte oratoria, sperimentazione vocale, coro.

Sabato 9 novembre

Ore 9:30 – 11:30
“Cantare la voce”
Laboratorio di improvvisazione vocale e canto popolare
con Anna Maria Civico

Ore 11:45 – 13:00
“Propriocezione vocale e respiratoria in chiave logopedica olistica”
Con Roberta Mazzocchi del centro foniatrico di Spoleto

Ore 13:30 – 18:30
“Overtune singing e canto difonico”
Laboratorio con Tran Quang Hai

SALA ATTIVITA’ BIBLIOTECA

UIV KIDS
Ore 16:00 – 18:00
“Ping Pong di letture selvagge” per bambini e adolescenti
A cura dell’Associazione “Settimana del libro”

Ore 18:45 – 19:30
“Centrarsi, sentirsi”
Mindfulness e voce con Federico Giubilei

Ore 20:00 Cena nel Centro Sociale Anziani

REFETTORIO BIBLIOTECA

Ore 21:30

“Longing”
Anna-Maria Hefele in concerto.
Voce e arpa

Domenica 10 novembre

10:00 – 13:00
“Liturgia”
Laboratorio con Domenico Castaldo, Laboratorio Permanente sull’arte dell’attore di Torino.

14:00 – 16:00
“Il battito e il respiro”
Laboratorio di canto popolare siciliano con Francesco Salvadore

16:30 – 17:30
“Comunicanti”
Laboratorio di voce e canti da intrecciare insieme, italiani e stranieri. Con Claudia Fofi.

18:00

Proiezione in anteprima del video della canzone “La valigia dello straniero”

18:30
“Strofiniamo il buio per farne luce.”
Reading con il poeta Franco Arminio e figli Livio e Manfredi


MODALITA’ PER ISCRIVERSI:

Si può partecipare al singolo laboratorio o a tutti gli eventi del fine settimana.
Dove non segnalato, gli eventi gratuiti. La giornata di venerdì 8 con il convegno, la presentazione-spettacolo e l’evento “Di voce in voce” al quale si può partecipare portando canzoni o poesie, è totalmente gratuita.

Di seguito, i costi per le iniziative del festival:
– “Cantare la voce” con Anna Maria Civico 30 €
– “Propriocezione vocale olistica” con Roberta Mazzocchi 15 €
– “Canto armonico” con Tran Quang Hai 75 €
– “Liturgia” con Domenico Castaldo 40 €
– “Canto popolare siciliano” con Francesco Salvadore 30 €
– Biglietto concerto Anna Maria Hefele (posti limitati, prenotazione obbligatoria) € 15 adulti, € 12 ridotto dai 12 ai 18 anni, gratuito per bambini e ragazzi sotto i 12 anni

Per chi si iscrive entro il 15 ottobre il costo totale è di 170 € da versare al momento dell’iscrizione. Invece, per chi si iscrive dopo questa data il costo è 190 € con caparra 50% rimborsabile se la cancellazione avviene entro il 28 ottobre
Le cene dell’8 e del 9, curate dal Centro Sociale Anziani, che gentilmente ci concede l’uso dei propri spazi, sono solo su prenotazione. Il costo a pasto è 10 €

Per il pernotto possiamo fornire indicazioni su richiesta.

Per iscriversi visitare la pagina “Iscrizioni” altrimenti contattare:
3349843087 (Irene)
3394076156 (Cristina)
o scrivere a umbriainvoce@gmail.com

TRAN QUANG HAI & ANNA MARIA HEFELE participate in the Festival UMBRIA IN VOCE 5th edition from 3 to 10 november 2019

Festival UMBRIA IN VOCE – 5a edizione dal 3 al 10 novembre

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Torna a Gubbio dal 3 al 10 novembre il festival Umbria in Voce, “festa della voce” unica nel suo genere che quest’anno giunge alla sua V edizione con un cartellone artistico di altissimo livello, grazie alla presenza di artisti internazionali e molteplici eventi aperti a tutti, tra cui concerti, conferenze, seminari, laboratori e presentazioni.
Organizzato dall’Associazione Archè con il sostegno del Comune di Gubbio e in collaborazione con un gruppo di cittadini volontari, il Festival è stato ideato dalla cantante e performer Claudia Fofi che ne cura la direzione artistica, e ha ospitato negli anni grandi artisti della voce e della parola come John De Leo, Franco Arminio, Albert Hera, Mauro Tiberi, Keba Sech e Marta Raviglia.
Unica nel suo genere, la manifestazione apre al pubblico e ai suoi partecipanti la possibilità di sperimentare nuovi linguaggi e di creare un luogo di incontro fisico e di gioia genuina tra le persone: funzione che un tempo era svolta dal canto popolare o di tradizione orale e che vuole essere attualizzata creando delle “comunità cantanti” in cui le persone si incontrano per vivere delle occasioni formative di altissimo livello, sempre aperte a tutti e non per specialisti.
Un evento che diviene dunque propulsore sociale, attivatore di relazioni, creatore di benessere immateriale.
Location d’eccezione, le Sale dell’ex Refettorio di una delle biblioteche più antiche d’Italia: la Biblioteca Sperelliana, uno dei tanti patrimoni artistici dell’incantevole città di Gubbio.

Il programma della V edizione si conferma denso di appuntamenti d’eccellenza e si pregia anzitutto di due importanti presenze di alto livello internazionale, che incarnano la dedica del festival al grande artista e sperimentatore della voce Demetrio Stratos, di cui quest’anno ricorre il quarantennale dalla scomparsa.
Primo tra gli ospiti, il vietnamita Tran Quang Hai, il più grande esperto e maestro al mondo del canto difonico: una tecnica vocale di origine sciamanica diffusa in Mongolia, in Siberia e in Sudafrica che ha introdotto nella musica contemporanea ricevendo molti riconoscimenti internazionali. Raffinato interprete delle tradizioni musicali dell’Estremo Oriente, è stato maestro di artisti come Demetrio Stratos,  e dal 1968 fa parte del gruppo di ricerca del CNRS, dipartimento di musicologia presso il Musée de l’Homme di Parigi. Sabato 9 novembre alle 13.30 sarà protagonista del seminario “Overtune singing e canto difonico”, della durata di 5 ore (info: umbriainvoce@gmail.com).

Altro ospite attesissimo è il fenomeno musicale Anna Maria Hefele: cantante, polistrumentista e compositrice tedesca, protagonista del video virale “Polyphonic Overtone Singing”. Il suo è un canto che si muove tra diverse tecniche – dalla musica classica al canto armonico – accompagnandosi con strumenti inusuali come l’arpa e la fascinosa e ipnotica nyckelharpa svedese. Per Umbria in Voce sarà protagonista sabato 9 novembre alle 21.30 del concerto “Longing” per arpa e voce, presentando la sua versatilità vocale in un “solo” che pochi cantanti al mondo possono affrontare con disinvoltura e vera bravura: dal folklore scandinavo e italiano del XVI secolo a Brian Eno, passando per composizioni originali in un unico viaggio che porta il pubblico in un mondo misterioso in cui il virtuosismo è al servizio della partecipazione emotiva e del mondo etereo e sognante di questa magnifica artista.

CONTATTI
www.umbriainvoce.it
Info e prenotazioni concerti e seminari: tel 334.9843087 – 339.4076156  email umbriainvoce@gmail.com
Ufficio Stampa Festival: Fiorenza Gherardi De Candei – tel. 328.1743236  email info@fiorenzagherardi.com

ENGLISH TRANSLATION

The program of the V edition confirms itself to be full of excellent events and first of all has the honor of two important presences of high international level, which embody the dedication of the festival to the great artist and experimenter of the voice Demetrio Stratos, of which this year mEarks the forty year since disappearance.
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First among the guests, the Vietnamese Tran Quang Hai, the greatest expert and master in the world of difonic singing: a vocal technique of shamanic origin widespread in Mongolia, Siberia and South Africa which he introduced into contemporary music receiving many international awards. Refined interpreter of the musical traditions of the Far East, he was a master of artists such as Demetrio Stratos, and since 1968 he is part of the research group of the CNRS, department of musicology at the Musée de l’Homme in Paris. Saturday 9 November at 13.30 will be the protagonist of the seminar “Overtone singing and singing difonico”, lasting 5 hours (info: umbriainvoce@gmail.com).

 

anna maria hefele.jpg

Another highly anticipated guest is the musical phenomenon Anna Maria Hefele: singer, multi-instrumentalist and German composer, protagonist of the viral video “Polyphonic Overtone Singing”. His is a song that moves between different techniques – from classical music to harmonic singing – accompanied by unusual instruments such as the harp and the fascinating and hypnotic Swedish nyckelharpa. For Umbria in Voce it will be the protagonist on Saturday November 9th at 9.30pm of the “Longing” concert for harp and voice, presenting its vocal versatility in a “solo” that few singers in the world can face with ease and true skill: from Scandinavian and Italian folklore of 16th century to Brian Eno, passing through original compositions in a single journey that takes the public into a mysterious world where virtuosity is at the service of emotional participation and the ethereal and dreamy world of this magnificent artist.

https://www.fiorenzagherardi.com/2019/09/23/festival-umbria-in-voce-5a-edizione-dal-3-al-10-novembre/