DAVE DARGIE : Umngqokolo: Xhosa Overtone Singing and the Song Nondel’ekhaya

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Journal Article

Umngqokolo: Xhosa Overtone Singing and the Song Nondel’ekhaya

David Dargie
African Music
Vol. 7, No. 1 (1991), pp. 33-47
Page Count: 15
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We’ll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Viewing page 33 of pages 33-47

Throat singing in South Africa july 2013

Throat singing in South Africa july 2013

Ajoutée le 2 juil. 2014

Throat singing in South Africa july 2013 in the Univercity at Fort Hare Jackie Janssens alias Jackie J Jassnes from Belgium teaching the locals. Throatsinging in South Africa is done by women. This is unique in the world. They use polyritmes. This is the only existing group (known) of women who still do “Umnokolo”. Umnokolo means rough sound, and is the style in wich they are singing. Proffessor Dargie made interesting resaerch. This litle film was made in the University Fort Hare in South Afrika at the symposium in july 2013. The teacher Jackie Janssens from Belgium More Info: Info@arttout.be

Throat Singing : A unique vocalization from three cultures

Soundscapes

Throat Singing

A unique vocalization from three cultures

Throat-singing, a guttural style of singing or chanting, is one of the world’s oldest forms of music. For those who think the human voice can produce only one note at a time, the resonant harmonies of throat-singing are surprising. In throat-singing, a singer can produce two or more notes simultaneously through specialized vocalization technique taking advantage of the throat’s resonance characteristics. By precise movements of the lips, tongue, jaw, velum, and larynx, throat-singers produce unique harmonies using only their bodies. Throat-singing is most identified with parts of Central Asia, but it is also practiced in northern Canada and South Africa where the technique takes on different styles and meanings.

Tuva

Tuva is a predominantly rural region of Russia located northwest of Mongolia. There, throat-singing is called Khöömei. Singers use a form of circular breathing which allows them to sustain multiple notes for long periods of time. Young Tuvan singers are trained from childhood through a sort of apprentice system to use the folds of the throat as reverberation chambers. Throat-singing in Tuva is almost exclusively practiced by men, although the taboo against women throat-singers, based on the belief that such singing may cause infertility, is gradually being abandoned, and some girls are now learning and performing Khöömei. The Tuvan herder/hunter lifestyle, with its reliance on the natural world and deeply-felt connection to the landscape, is reflected in this Tuvan vocal tradition. With their throat-singing, Tuvans imitate sounds of the natural surroundings—animals, mountains, streams, and the harsh winds of the steppe. Throat-singing was once only a folk tradition, practiced in the windy steppe, but it is now embraced as an emblem of Tuvan identity and more often performed by professionals in formal settings.

Video

Video: N. Sengedorj of Mongolia demonstrates Khöömei throat-singing.

Video

Video: Mark van Tongeren, an ethnomusicologist specializing in Khöömei, gives a lesson.

Inuit

The Inuit are the indigenous peoples of northern Canada. Unlike Tuvan throat-singing, the Inuit form of throat-singing is practiced almost exclusively by women. It is also a more communal form of singing than the Tuvan variety, usually performed in groups of two or more women. Their technique relies more on short, sharp, rhythmic inhalations and exhalations of breath. It was traditionally used to sing babies to sleep or in games women played during the long winter nights while the men were away hunting. Throat-singing was banned in the area over 100 years ago by local Christian priests, but it is experiencing a recent revival, especially among younger generations who believe that learning it from their elders connects them with Inuit strength and tradition.

Video

Video: Nukariik (Inuit) Sisters Karin and Kathy Kettler demonstrate traditional Inuit throat singing practiced by women in their community.

Xhosa

The Xhosa people of Bantu origins are indigenous to present-day southeast South Africa. Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu are famous Xhosa. The Xhosa people have a deep and unique style of throat singing, also called eefing. Two notes are produced one tone apart while higher tones embedded in overtones are amplified simultaneously. This low, rhythmic, wordless vocal style accompanies traditional call and response or group vocal songs. It also accompanies party songs and dances, adding a musical element that is distinctly Xhosa.

https://folkways.si.edu/throat-singing-unique-vocalization-three-cultures/world/music/article/smithsonian

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Medley of various throat-singing
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Xöömei on Horseback

Kaigal-ool Khovalyg and Anatoli Kuular
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UMNGQOKOLO – Thembu Xhosa – OVERTONE SINGING filmed 1985-1998 in South Africa

UMNGQOKOLO – Thembu Xhosa – OVERTONE SINGING filmed 1985-1998 in South Africa
QuangHai Tran
Published on May 17, 2012
All these video recordings were made by Prof.Dr. Dave Dargie in South Africa from 1985 and 1998 among the Xhosa tribe .
Mrs. Nowxayilethi Mbizweni sings the song “the Nondel’ekhaya with “ordinary” umnqokolo, umngqokolo ngomqangi and normal voice .
The trio perform Nondel’ekhaya with “ordinary” umngqokolo (Nowayilethi tried ngomqangi, but was battling with “flu”)
Concert at Ngqoko, 22 march 1996 . Nowayilethi and Nosomething lead the Ngqoko group with umngqokolo etc…..
Contact : Prof.Dr. Dave Dargie,
Email: dave.dargie@t-online.de

OVERTONE SINGING UMNGQOKOLO by Xhosa women from SOUTH AFRICA

OVERTONE SINGING UMNGQOKOLO by Xhosa women from SOUTH AFRICA
QuangHai Tran
Published on May 16, 2012
Prof.Dr. Dave DARGIE made the best video recordings from 1985 to 1998 in South Africa with Xhosa female singers .
To obtain more information about Umngqokolo – Thembu Xhosa – Overtone singing, please contact Prof.Dr Dave Dargie,Ostpreussenstr 81,
D-81927 München, GERMANY or write to him :
email: dave.dargie@t-online.de

CREM , Francee: Collection : Examples of xhosa music (umngqokolo, dances), 1985 [vidéo], recordings by Dr. Dave Dargie

Collection : Examples of xhosa music (umngqokolo, dances), 1985 [vidéo]

4 items (Voir liste)
Titre
Examples of xhosa music (umngqokolo, dances), 1985 [vidéo]
Déposant / contributeur
Dargie, Dave
Statut du document
Inédits
Contexte d’enregistrement
Terrain
Période d’enregistrement
1985 – 1985
Type d’accès
Consultation restreinte

Indications géographiques et culturelles

États / nations
Transkei
Populations / groupes sociaux
Xhosa

Mentions légales

Collecteur
Dargie, Dave
Éditeur
– Non édité (copie)
Droit d’utilisation
Restreint

Média associés

Média Prévisualisation
Titre
Extraits en ligne : UMNGQOKOLO – Thembu Xhosa – OVERTONE SINGING
Description
All these video recordings were made by Prof.Dr. Dave Dargie in South Africa from 1985 and 1998 among the Xhosa tribe . Mrs. Nowxayilethi Mbizweni sings the song “the Nondel’ekhaya with “ordinary” umnqokolo, umngqokolo ngomqangi and normal voice .
The trio perform Nondel’ekhaya with “ordinary” umngqokolo (Nowayilethi tried ngomqangi, but was battling with “flu”).
Consultée le 15 avril 2013
Crédits
Dargie, Dave
Titre
Extraits en ligne : OVERTONE SINGING UMNGQOKOLO by Xhosa women from SOUTH AFRICA
Description
Prof.Dr. Dave DARGIE made the best video recordings from 1985 to 1998 in South Africa with Xhosa female singers .
Consultée le 15 avril 2013
Crédits
Dargie, Dave

Items

Titre Numérisé Collecteur Lieu Année d’enregistrement Cote
d Examples of xhosa music (umngqokolo, dances) _01 d Dargie, Dave Transkei 1985 CNRSMH_I_1990_011_001_01
d Examples of xhosa music (umngqokolo, dances) _02 d Dargie, Dave Transkei 1985 CNRSMH_I_1990_011_001_02
d Examples of xhosa music (umngqokolo, dances) _03 d Dargie, Dave Transkei 1985 CNRSMH_I_1990_011_001_03
d Examples of xhosa music (umngqokolo, dances) _04 d Dargie, Dave Transkei 1985 CNRSMH_I_1990_011_001_04

Throat singing in South Africa july 2013

Throat singing in South Africa july 2013

Published on Jul 2, 2014

Throat singing in South Africa july 2013 in the Univercity at Fort Hare Jackie Janssens alias Jackie J Jassnes from Belgium teaching the locals. Throatsinging in South Africa is done by women. This is unique in the world. They use polyritmes. This is the only existing group (known) of women who still do “Umnokolo”. Umnokolo means rough sound, and is the style in wich they are singing. Professor Dargie made interesting resaerch. This litle film was made in the University Fort Hare in South Afrika at the symposium in july 2013. The teacher Jackie Janssens from Belgium More Info: Info@arttout.be

UMNGQOKOLO – Thembu Xhosa – OVERTONE SINGING filmed 1985-1998 in South Africa

UMNGQOKOLO – Thembu Xhosa – OVERTONE SINGING filmed 1985-1998 in South Africa

Published on May 17, 2012

All these video recordings were made by Prof.Dr. Dave Dargie in South Africa from 1985 and 1998 among the Xhosa tribe . Mrs. Nowxayilethi Mbizweni sings the song “the Nondel’ekhaya with “ordinary” umnqokolo, umngqokolo ngomqangi and normal voice . The trio perform Nondel’ekhaya with “ordinary” umngqokolo (Nowayilethi tried ngomqangi, but was battling with “flu”) Concert at Ngqoko, 22 march 1996 . Nowayilethi and Nosomething lead the Ngqoko group with umngqokolo etc….. Contact : Prof.Dr. Dave Dargie, Email: dave.dargie@t-online.de