Bunun millet germination song Taiwan

Bunun millet germination song Taiwan

Ajoutée le 27 avr. 2011

The Bunun are one of the original communities of Taiwan, originating from the west coast but pushed back towards the centre by Chinese immigrants. At present they number about 35.000 and occupy the heart of the mountainous chain, dispersed into approximately 120 villages. Their beliefs are founded in the manipulation of the living, animals and millet.

Bunun millet germination song Taiwan

Prof. TSAI Chen-Gia’s publications

Tsai, Chen-Gia

Associate professor, Graduate Institute of Musicology

Ctr. for Neurobiology and Cognitive Science

National Taiwan University, Taiwan

Research Interests

Biomusicology, neuroesthetics, arts and medicine, affective science, music acoustics, Xiqu

Books

Tsai, C.G.*, & Chen, R.S. (2017). Structures and Emotions in Chinese Sentimental Ballads: A Perspective of Cognitive Psychology (in Chinese). Taipei: Faces Publishing LTD.

Tsai, C.G. (2013). The Cognitive Psychology of Music (in Chinese). Taipei: NTU Press.

Tsai, C.G. (2011). Alternative Watching/Listening: Brain Diseases and Voice Disorders in Performing Arts (in Chinese). Taipei: NTU Press.

Journal Articles

Tsai, C.G. (2018). The psychology of musical creativity: the self, executive control, and generation of creative ideas (in Chinese). Journal of National Taiwan University of Arts, 27.

Tsai, C.G., Chou T.L., & Li, C.W.* (2018). Roles of posterior parietal and dorsal premotor cortices in relative pitch processing: comparing musical intervals to lexical tones. Neuropsychologia, 119, 118-127. [SCI, IF=2.888]

Tsai, C.G., Du, W., & Chen, C.L.* (2017). Influence of literature music on the museum visitor experience: a case study of the Laiho Memorial Museum (in Chinese). Museology Quarterly, 31(3), 5-29.

Tsai, C.G., Li, C.W., Yeh, C.H., Chen, R.S., & Lin, Y.S.* (2017). Why do mandarin popular songs usually deal with break-ups? The therapeutic potential of sentimental ballads (in Chinese). Indigenous Psychological Research in Chinese Societies, 47, 371-420. [TSSCI]

Wu, M.T., & Tsai, C.G.* (2017). Emotional effects of Teresa Teng’s songs in Taiwanese healthy and disabled older adults (in Chinese). Journal of Humanities, Social Sciences and Medicine, 4, 119-138.

Tsai, C.G.*, & Hsia, L.T. (2107). Musical features and theatrical uses of Jin-La-Man-Chang rhythmic mode in Xiqu (in Chinese). Taipei Theatre Journal, 25, 105-128.

Wen, Y.C., & Tsai, C.G.* (2017). The effect of harmonization on cortical magnetic responses evoked by music of rapidly changing tonalities. Psychology of Music, 45(1), 22-35. [SSCI, IF=2.173]

Cheng, T.H., & Tsai, C.G.* (2016). Female listeners’ autonomic responses to dramatic shifts between loud and soft music/sound passages: a study of heavy metal songs. Frontiers in Psychology, 7, 182. [SSCI, IF=2.560]

Tsai, Y.H., & Tsai, C.G.* (2016). Emotional effects of the chorus scenes in musicals on audience: a study on Les Misérables and Chicago (in Chinese). Collected Papers on Arts Research, 25, 147-166.

Li, C.W., Chen, J.H., & Tsai, C.G.* (2015). Listening to music in a risk-reward context: the roles of the temporoparietal junction and the orbitofrontal/insular cortices in reward-anticipation, reward-gain, and reward-loss. Brain Research, 1629, 160-170. [SCI, IF=2.988]

Chen, C.L., & Tsai, C.G.* (2015). The influence of background music on the visitor museum experience: a case study of the Laiho Memorial Museum. Visitor Studies, 18(2), 183-195.

Tsai, C.G.*, & Chen, C.P. (2015). Musical tension over time: listeners’ physiological responses to the ‘retransition’ in classical sonata form. Journal of New Music Research, 44(3), 271-286. [SSCI, IF=0.771]

Tsai, C.G.*, Yang, C.M., Chen, C.C., Chen, I.P., & Liang, K.C. (2015). Relaxation and executive control processes in listeners: an exploratory study of music-induced transient suppression of skin conductance responses. Empirical Studies of the Arts, 33(2), 125-143. [SSCI, IF=0.370]

Chang, Y.H., Lee, Y.Y., Liang, K.C., Chen, I. P., Tsai, C.G.*, & Hsieh, S.* (2015). Experiencing affective music in eyes-closed and eyes-open states: an electroencephalography study. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 1160. [SSCI, IF=2.560]

Tsai, C.G., Chen, C.C., Wen, Y.C., & Chou T.L.* (2015). Neuromagnetic brain activities associated with perceptual categorization and sound-content incongruency: a comparison of music and speech. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9, 455. [SCI, IF=3.626]

Tzeng, N.S., & Tsai, C.G.* (2015). Dutuo and salvation in Beijing Opera Peng-Bei (Tragic Monument in Yang’s Saga) and Nan-Tien-Men (South Heavenly Gate): a study from the perspectives of psychiatry and audience psychology (in Chinese). Taipei Theatre Journal, 22, 25-50.

Tsai, C.G., & Tzeng. N.S.* (2015). Music therapy for the elderly: perspectives from cognitive neuroscience (in Chinese). Journal of Humanities, Social Sciences and Medicine, 2, 87-106.

Tsai, C.G.*, Chen, R.S., & Yu, S.P. (2014). Analyzing the verse-chorus form: schema shifts and musical rewards in lyrical-slow songs (in Chinese). Research in Applied Psychology, 61, 239-286.

Tsai, C.G.*, Chen, R.S., & Tsai, T.S. (2014). The arousing and cathartic effects of popular heartbreak songs as revealed in the physiological responses of listeners. Musicae Scientiae, 18(4), 410-422. [SSCI, IF=1.537]

Tan, W.H., Tsai, C.G., Lin, C., & Lin, Y.K.* (2014). Urban canyon effect: storm drains enhance call characteristics of the Mientien tree frog. Journal of Zoology, 294(2), 77-84. [SCI, IF=1.545] [reports: Nature, bioforum.tw]

Yang, I.H., & Tsai, C.G.* (2014). Plucking positions on the guzheng strings: timbral analysis and performance practice (in Chinese). Yin Yue Yan Jiu, 19, 1-30.

Tsai, C.G.* (2014). The emotional expressions and structure in Beijing opera Pong-Yin: combining performance analysis with audience’s physiological measures (in Chinese). Journal of Traditional Chinese Theater, 11, 125-161.

Chen, I.P.*, Lin, Z.X., & Tsai, C.G. (2013). A felt-emotion-based corpora of music emotions (in Chinese). Chinese Journal of Psychology, 55(4), 571-599. [TSSCI]

Tsai, C.G.* (2013). Relationships between musical emotions and music cognition: dialogues between aesthetics and psychology (in Chinese). Journal of Xinghai Conservatory of Music, 2013.2, 120-127.

Tsai, C.G.*, & Chen, R.S. (2012). Desire, resolution, and reward system: listeners’ emotional responses to musical cadences (in Chinese). Journal of National Taiwan University of Arts, 90, 325-345.

Tsai, C.G., Fan, L.Y., Lee, S.H., Chen, J.H., & Chou, T.L.* (2012). Specialization of the posterior temporal lobes for audio-motor processing – evidence from a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of skilled drummers. European Journal of Neuroscience, 35(4), 634–643. [SCI, IF=3.658]

Yang, W.C., & Tsai, C.G.* (2011). Telling the red myth with western music: the function and practice of musical schema shifts in model Beijing operas (in Chinese). Taipei Theatre Journal, 13, 131-157.

Tsai, C.G.*, Chen, C.C., Chou, T.L., & Chen, J.H. (2010). Neural mechanisms involved in the oral representation of percussion music: an fMRI study. Brain and Cognition, 74(2), 123-131. [SCI & SSCI, IF=2.547]

Tsai, C.G.* (2010). The song forms in cultures of humpback whales and songbirds: interdisciplinary perspectives of biomusicology (in Chinese). Huangzhong-Journal of Wuhan Music Conservatory, 2010.4, 129-134.

Tsai, C.G., Chen, C.L.*, & Lee, J.W. (2010). Literature soundscape in the museum: on the roles and functions of sound elements in literature exhibitions (in Chinese). Museology Quarterly, 24(1), 93-115.

Tsai, C.G.*, Wang, L.C., Wang, S.F., Shau, Y.W., Hsiao, T.Y., & Auhagen, W. (2010). Aggressiveness of the growl-like timbre: acoustic characteristics, musical implications, and biomechanical mechanisms. Music Perception, 27(3), 209-221. [SSCI, IF=1.068]

Tsai, C.G.* (2009). The Taiwanese horned fiddle: an example of exaptation of musical instruments (in Chinese). Huangzhong-Journal of Wuhan Music Conservatory, 2009.4, 129-134.

Tsai, C.G., Chen, J.H., Shau, Y.W., & Hsiao, T.Y.* (2009). Dynamic B-mode ultrasound imaging of vocal fold vibration during phonation. Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology, 35(11), 1812-1818. [SCI, IF=2.395]

Tsai, C.G.* (2009). Impure musical sounds: auditory model and harmonic-to-noise ratio (in Chinese). Guandu Music Journal, 10, 113-125

Tsai, C.G.* (2009). From propaganda to dramatic ornaments: arias and divertissements in modern Beijing operas in 1958-1976 (in Chinese). Taipei Theatre Journal, 10, 113-147.

Tsai, C.G.* (2008). String vibration with nonlinear boundary condition: an acoustical study of “blossoming tones” produced by the junhu (in Chinese). Huangzhong-Journal of Wuhan Music Conservatory, 2008.4, 168-173.

Tsai, C.G.* (2008). Madness by romantic identification: Brain diseases in Xiqu (in Chinese). Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore, 161, 83-133. [TSSCI]

Tsai, C.G., Shau, Y.W., Liu, H.M., & Hsiao, T.Y.* (2008). Laryngeal mechanisms during human 4 kHz vocalization studied with CT, videostroboscopy, and color Doppler imaging. Journal of Voice, 22(3), 275-282. [SCI, IF=0.953]

Tsai, C.G.*, & Lin, Y.Y. (2008). Contributions of epilepsy research to the psychology of music (in Chinese). Journal of Xinghai Conservatory of Music, 2008.1, 31-37.

Tsai, C.G.* (2007). When Beijing Opera actors meet Beiguan Opera: an impartation project for Beiguan Opera by Xiao-Yiao Theater (in Chinese). Journal of Culture Resources, 3, 75-94.

Tsai, C.G.* (2006). Disease and composing: syphilis in Smetana, Wolf, and Schubert (in Chinese). Formosan Journal of Music Research, 3, 91-106.

Tsai, C.G.* (2006). Towards the cognitive psychology of Xiqu music: examples from Xi-Mei-Fong-Yun and Da-Tzei-Men (in Chinese). Performing Arts Journal, 12, 159-172.

Tsai, C.G.* (2005). Chaotic behavior of performers’ vocalizations: an interdisciplinary study of growl voices (in Chinese). Taipei Theatre Journal, 2, 39-62.

Tsai, C.G.* (2004). Absolute pitch: studies in cognitive psychology (in Chinese). Guandu Music Journal, 1, 77-92.

Tsai, C.G.* (2000). Fu-Lu Sheng-Qiang of Taiwanese Luan-Tan-Xi belongs to Luan-Tan-Qiang system: evidence from tunes and repertory (in Chinese). Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore, 123, 43-88.

Tsai, C.G.* (1997). A comparison of Chinese Nan-Xi and opera comique: the structure of He-To and vaudeville final (in Chinese). Arts Review, 8, 163-185.

Tsai, C.G.* (1997). A preliminary study on music of Luan-Tan Xiao-Xi (in Chinese). Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore, 106, 1-29.

[Chinese version / Home]

email :
tsaichengia@ntu.edu.tw

biography of Prof. Dr. TSAI Chen-Gia

院) Musicology (音樂學研究所) CHEN-GIA TSAI (蔡振家)
tsai chengia.jpg

Musicology (音樂學研究所)

JEN-YEN CHEN (陳人彥)
TUNG SHEN (沈冬)
CHEN-GIA TSAI (蔡振家)
YING-FEN WANG (王櫻芬)
YUH-WEN WANG (王育雯)
FUMITAKA YAMAUCHI (山內文登)
CHIEN-CHANG YANG (楊建章)

CHEN-GIA TSAI (蔡振家)
ORCID
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Musicology (音樂學研究所)
Associate Professor (副教授)
+886-2-3366-4691
tsaichengia@ntu.edu.tw
Website

teacher.Profile
teacher.Publications 44

teacher.Profile 2017-12-04 16:09:53
teacher.Education Ph.D. , Systematic Musicology , Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Humboldt University of Berlin) , Berlin , Germany, Federal Republic of Germany , 2004
teacher.CareerAndExperience teacher.CurrentPositions:

2011- Now, Associate Professor, Graduate Institute of Musicology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC

teacher.Experiences:

2006- 2011, Assistant Professor, Graduate Institute of Musicology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC
2006- 2006, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Graduate Institute of Musicology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC

teacher.ResearchField

Chinese theater music
biomusicology
phoniatics
music acoustics
psychoacoustics

http://ah.ntu.edu.tw/web/Teacher!one.action?tid=2530

Tsai, Chen-gia, biography

Tsai, Chen-gia, biography

Chen-gia_Tsai

Tsai, Chen-gia

Assistant professor, Graduate Institute of Musicology, National Taiwan University

PhD (Musikwissenschaft), Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin

Research Interests

Biomusicology, music cognition, vocal fold dynamics, music acoustics, Chinese opera

Courses Opened

Music of local Xiqu; Music acoustics; Music, evolution and the brain; Feeling and representations of love: linguistic and musicological perspectives

Journal Articles

Tsai, C.G. (2010). The song forms in cultures of humpback whales and songbirds: interdisciplinary perspectives of biomusicology (in Chinese). Journal of Xinghai Conservatory of Music (in press)

Tsai, C.G., Chen, C.C., Chou, T.L., Chen, J.H. (2010). Neural mechanisms involved in the oral representation of percussion music: an fMRI study. Brain and Cognition 74(2): 123-131. [SCI & SSCI, IF=2.547]

Tsai, C.G., Chen, C.L., and Lee, J.W. (2010). Literature soundscape in the museum: on the roles and functions of sound elements in literature exhibitions (in Chinese). Museology Quarterly 24(1):93-115. [THCI]

Tsai, C.G., Wang, L.C., Wang, S.F., Shau, Y.W., Hsiao, T.Y., and Wolfgang Auhagen. (2010). Aggressiveness of the growl-like timbre: acoustic characteristics, musical implications, and biomechanical mechanisms. Music Perception 27(3):209-221. [SSCI, IF=1.714]

Lu, Y.H., and Tsai, C.G. (2009). Importance of motor imagery for music performance: Evidence from neuroscience (in Chinese). Guandu Music Journal 11:75-90.

Tsai, C.G., (2009). The Taiwanese horned fiddle: An example of exaptation of musical instruments (in Chinese). Huangzhong-Journal of Wuhan Music Conservatory 2009.4:129-134. [CSSCI]

Tsai, C.G., Chen, J.H., Shau, Y.W., and Hsiao, T.Y. (2009). Dynamic B-mode ultrasound imaging of vocal fold vibration during phonation. Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology 35(11):1812-1818. [SCI, IF=2.395]

Tsai, C.G. (2009). Impure musical sounds: auditory model and harmonic-to-noise ratio (in Chinese). Guandu Music Journal 10:113-125.

Tsai, C.G. (2009). From propaganda to dramatic ornaments: arias and divertissements in modern Beijing operas in 1958-1976 (in Chinese). Taipei Theatre Journal 10:113-147. [THCI]

Tsai, C.G. (2008). String vibration with nonlinear boundary condition: an acoustical study of “blossoming tones” produced by the junhu (in Chinese). Huangzhong-Journal of Wuhan Music Conservatory 2008.4:168-173. [CSSCI]

Tsai, C.G. (2008). Madness by romantic identification: Brain diseases in Xiqu (in Chinese). Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore 161:83-133. [TSSCI]

Tsai, C.G., Shau, Y.W., Liu, H.M., and Hsiao, T.Y. (2008). Laryngeal mechanisms during human 4 kHz vocalization studied with CT, videostroboscopy, and color Doppler imaging. Journal of Voice 22(3):275-282. [SCI, IF=1.143]

Tsai, C.G., Lin, Y.Y. (2008). Contributions of epilepsy research to the psychology of music (in Chinese). Journal of Xinghai Conservatory of Music 2008.1:31-37.

Tsai, C.G. (2007). When Beijing Opera actors meet Beiguan Opera: An impartation project for Beiguan Opera by Xiao-Yiao Theater (in Chinese). Journal of Culture Resources 3:75-94.

Tsai, C.G. (2006). Disease and composing: Syphilis in Smetana, Wolf, and Schubert (in Chinese). Formosan Journal of Music Research 3:91-106.

Tsai, C.G. (2006). Towards the cognitive psychology of Xiqu music: Examples from Xi-Mei-Fong-Yun and Da-Tzei-Men (in Chinese). Performing Arts Journal 12:159-172.

Tsai, C.G. (2005). Chaotic behavior of performers’ vocalizations: an interdisciplinary study of growl voices (in Chinese). Taipei Theatre Journal 2:39-62.

Tsai, C.G. (2004). Absolute pitch: studies in cognitive psychology (in Chinese). Guandu Music Journal 1:77-92.

Tsai, C.G. (2000). Fu-Lu Sheng-Qiang of Taiwanese Luan-Tan-Xi belongs to Luan-Tan-Qiang system: evidence from tunes and repertory (in Chinese). Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore 123:43-88.

Tsai, C.G. (1997). A comparison of Chinese Nan-Xi and opera comique: the structure of He-To and vaudeville final (in Chinese). Arts Review 8:163-185.

Tsai, C.G. (1997). A preliminary study on music of Luan-Tan Xiao-Xi (in Chinese). Journal of Chinese Ritual, Theatre and Folklore 106:1-29.

Conference Papers

Tsai, C.G. (2010). Oral representations of Beijing opera percussion music and jazz drum music: fMRI studies (oral). 「迎向21世紀台灣音樂學:全球化與跨文化」研討會,11月30日至12月2日,國立臺北藝術大學,臺灣

Chen, C.L., and Tsai, C.G. (2010). 〈博物館中的文學風景:台灣文學博物館發展與展示內涵之研究〉(oral). 「博物館展示的景觀」研討會,11月18-19日,國立臺北藝術大學,臺灣

Chen, I.P., and Tsai, C.G. (2010). Emotional attributes of music (oral). 「情緒標準刺激與反應常模的基礎研究」99年度計畫研討會,11月6日,國立中正大學,臺灣

Wang, L.C., and Tsai, C.G. (2010). Beat Perception through body movements: a case study of Nanguan, Beiguan and western classic music (oral). The 3rd International Conference of Students of Systematic Musicology, September13-15, 2010, Cambridge, UK.

Huang, P.L., and Tsai, C.G. (2010). Pitch glide in Chinese small gongs: effects of macrostructure and microstructure. International Symposium on Music Acoustics, 30-31 August, Sydney, Australia.

Tsai, C.G., Bai, M.R. (2010). An acoustical and historical study of the Taiwanese horned fiddle: Exaptation of musical instruments. International Symposium on Music Acoustics, 30-31 August, Sydney, Australia.

Cheng, J.Y., Tsai, C.G. and Lee, S.C. (2010). Bamboos as the material for saxophone reed. 20th International Congress on Acoustics, 23-27 August, Sydney, Australia.

Tsai, C.G., Auhagen, W., and Causse, R. (2009). The nonlinear membrane of Chinese flutes: its impacts on timbre and performance techniques (oral). 5th Conference on Interdisciplinary Musicology (CIM09). October 26-29, Paris, France.

Tsai, C.G. (2009). Possible impact of brain-imaging technology on the psychology of Asian music (oral). CUHK-NTU Music Forum 2009, 2-3 Jan 2009, Hong Kong, China.

Tsai, C.G. (2008). Emotional contents of the growl-like timbre: a study of biomechanics (oral). Taiwan Symposium on Musicology 2008, Tainan, Taiwan.

Tsai, C.G., Hsiao, T.Y., Shau, Y.W., and Wang, S.F. (2008). Aggressiveness of the growl-like timbre: acoustical features and biomechanical mechanisms (oral). 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, 25-29 August 2008, Sapporo, Japan.

Chen, J.H., Chang, M.D., Tsai, C.G., Hsiao, T.Y., and Shau, Y.W. (2008). On the application of PIV algorithms to the analysis of ultrasound images of vocal fold tissues during phonation. 13th International Symposium on Flow Visualization, Nice, France, July 1-4, 2008.

Tsai, C.G. (2008). Oral transmission of music: roles of the mirror neuron system in humans and humpback whales (oral). Mini-Symposium on Cultural Evolution & Human Ecology, 30 May, Taipei, Taiwan.

Tsai, C.G. (2007). Cognitive mechanisms revealed by some forms of animal song: chunking, working memory, and self-associative memory (oral). Taiwan Symposium on Musicology 2007, December 14-15, Taipei, Taiwan.

Tsai, C.G., Chen, J.H., Hsiao, T.Y., and Shau, Y.W. (2007). A seawater-seabed model of vocal fold vibration: in-vivo measurements of amplitude attenuation and phase lag (oral). International Symposium on Musical Acoustics, 9-12 September, Barcelona, Spain.

Tsai, C.G., Chen, C.C., Chen, D.Y., Chou, T.L., Chen, C.H., Lee, C.W. (2007). Musical memes and oral tradition: the role of an auditory mirror system in music transmission and cognition (oral). Music and Evolutionary Thought Conference, June 22-23, Durham, England.

Tsai, C.G. (2006). Inharmonic sounds of bowed strings in Western music and Beijing Opera (oral). 4th Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the Acoustical Society of Japan, 28 November-2 December, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

Tsai, C.G., Shau, Y.W., and Hsiao, T.Y. (2006). Vocal fold wave velocity in the cover and body layers measured in vivo using dynamic sonography (oral). 7th International Conference on Advances in Quantitative Laryngology, Voice and Speech Research, October 6-7, 2006, Groningen, the Netherlands.

Tsai, C.G., Hsiao, T.Y., Shau, Y.W. and Chen, J.H. (2006). Towards an intermediate water wave model of vocal fold vibration: Evidence from vocal-fold dynamic sonography (oral). International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics, July 12-14 2006, Tokyo, Japan.

Tsai, C.G. (2005). Disease and composing: Syphilis in Smetana, Wolf, Schubert (oral). Taiwan Symposium on Musicology 2005, November 11-12, Taipei, Taiwan.

Tsai, C.G., Auhagen, W. (2005). Intonation, tone range and timbre of the Chinese flute (dizi): a Duffing oscillator model of the dizi membrane (oral). Symposium on Traditional Musical Instruments, September 10-11, 2005, Taipei, Taiwan.

Tsai, C.G. (2005). Multi-pitch effect on cognition of solo music: examples of the Chinese flute, Jew’s harp and overtone singing (oral). International Symposium on Body & Cognition, June 4-5, Taipei, Taiwan.

Tsai, C.G. (2004). The timbre space of the Chinese membrane flute (dizi): physical and psychoacoustical effects (invited). 148th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, November 15-19, San Diego.

Tsai, C.G., Shau, Y.W., and Hsiao, T.Y. (2004). False vocal fold surface waves during Sygyt singing: a hypothesis (oral). International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics, August 18-20, Marseille, France.

Chen, J.H., and Tsai, C.G. (2004). Experimental research of the flow field in a brass mouthpiece-like channel using Particle Image Velocimetry (poster). Proceedings of the International Symposium on Musical Acoustics, March 31-April 3, Nara, Japan.

Tsai, C.G. (2004). Auditory grouping in the perception of roughness induced by subharmonics: empirical findings and a qualitative model (oral). Proceedings of the International Symposium on Musical Acoustics, March 31-April 3, Nara, Japan.

Tsai, C.G. (2004). Helmholtz’s nasality revisited: physics and perception of sounds with predominance of upper odd-numbered harmonics (poster). Proceedings of the International Symposium on Musical Acoustics, March 31-April 3, Nara, Japan.

Tsai, C.G. (2003). Relating the harmonic-rich sound of the Chinese flute (dizi) to the cubic nonlinearity of its membrane (poster). Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference 2003, August 6-9, Stockholm, Sweden.

[Blog / Chinese version]

http://www.gim.ntu.edu.tw/gia/

TSAI Chen-Gia, Ph.D. Acoustics, Taiwan, selectec publications

TSAI Chen-Gia, Ph.D. Acoustics, Taiwan

Chen-gia_Tsai

Vocal fold vibration and singing

* Ultrasonic imaging of vocal folds
* Vocal fold vibration as sea waves on a porous seabed
* Overtone singing & high-frequency vocalization
* Growl voice & spine stability

Chen-Gia Tsai
Assistant Professor, Graduate Institute of Musicology
National Taiwan University, Taipei, TAIWAN

Ph.D., Musikwissenschaft
Humboldt-University Berlin, Germany
Research Interests
Mechanics of the Chinese membrane flute

* Acoustic effects of the dizi membrane
* Linear effects of the membrane: impedance
* Nonlinear effects of the membrane I: jump phenomena and wrinkles in the membrane
* Nonlinear effects of the membrane II: spectral features

Perception of musical sounds

* Brightness and spatial effects
* Helmholtz’s hollowness and nasality
* Roughness induced by subharmonics

Vocal fold vibration and singing

* Ultrasonic imaging of vocal folds
* Vocal fold vibration as sea waves on a porous seabed
* Overtone singing & high-frequency vocalization
* Growl voice & spine stability

Biomusicology

* Absolute pitch
* Music & biological motor system
* Chinese opera music & memetics

Selected Publications
Journal papers

C.G. Tsai (2004) Absolute pitch: studies in cognitive psychology. Guandu Music Journal 1, 77-92.

C.G. Tsai (2005) Chaotic behavior of performer’s vocalizations: an interdisciplinary study of growl voices. Taipei Theatre Journal 2, 39-62.

C.G. Tsai (2006) Disease and Composing: Syphilis in Smetana, Wolf, and Schubert. Formosan Journal of Music Research 3, 91-106.

Chen-Gia Tsai, Yio-Wha Shau, Hon-Man Liu, and Tzu-Yu Hsiao. Laryngeal mechanisms during human 4 kHz vocalization studied with CT, videostroboscopy, and color Doppler imaging (accepted by Journal of Voice)
Conference papers

C.G. Tsai (2003) Relating the harmonic-rich sound of the Chinese flute (dizi) to the cubic nonlinearity of its membrane (poster). Stockholm Music Acoustics Conference 2003, August 6-9.

C.G. Tsai (2004) Helmholtz’s nasality revisited: physics and perception of sounds with predominance of upper odd-numbered harmonics (poster). Proceedings of the International Symposium on Musical Acoustics, March 31-April 3, Nara, Japan.

C.G. Tsai (2004) Auditory grouping in the perception of roughness induced by subharmonics: empirical findings and a qualitative model (oral). Proceedings of the International Symposium on Musical Acoustics, March 31-April 3, Nara, Japan.

J.H. Chen, and C.G. Tsai (2004) Experimental research of the flow field in a brass mouthpiece-like channel using Particle Image Velocimetry (poster). Proceedings of the International Symposium on Musical Acoustics, March 31-April 3, Nara, Japan.

C.G. Tsai, Y.W. Shau, and T.Y. Hsiao (2004) False vocal fold surface waves during Sygyt singing: a hypothesis (oral). International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics, August 18-20, Marseille, France.

C.G. Tsai (2004) The timbre space of the Chinese membrane flute (dizi): physical and psychoacoustical effects (invited). 148th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, November 15-19, San Diego.

C.G. Tsai (2005) Multi-pitch effect on cognition of solo music: examples of the Chinese flute, Jew’s harp and overtone singing (oral). International Symposium on Body & Cognition, June 4-5, Taipei, Taiwan.

C.G. Tsai, W. Auhagen (2005) Intonation, tone range and timbre of the Chinese flute (dizi): a Duffing oscillator model of the dizi membrane (oral). Conference on Traditional Music Instruments, September 10-11, Taipei, Taiwan.

C.G. Tsai (2005) Disease and composing: syphilis in Smetana, Wolf, and Schubert (oral). Taiwan Symposium on Musicology, November 11-12, Taipei, Taiwan.

C.G. Tsai, T.Y. Hsiao, Y.W. Shau, and J.H. Chen (2006) Towards an intermediate water wave model of vocal fold vibration: Evidence from vocal-fold dynamic sonography (oral). International Conference on Voice Physiology and Biomechanics, July 12-14 2006, Tokyo, Japan.

C.G. Tsai, Y.W. Shau, and T.Y. Hsiao (2006) Vocal fold wave velocity in the cover and body layers measured in vivo using dynamic sonography (oral). 7th International Conference on Advances in Quantitative Laryngology, Voice and Speech Research, October 6-7, 2006, Groningen, the Netherlands.

C.G. Tsai (2006) Inharmonic sounds of bowed strings in Western music and Beijing opera (oral). 4th Joint Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America and the Acoustical Society of Japan, 28 November-2 December, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.
Links

* Music Acoustics Laboratory at UNSW (impedance measurements of the dizi were performed there)
* Mitzi Meyerson’s homepage (my favorite harpsichordist)
* Introduction to the Qin
* Learn traditional Chinese painting
* Liu Fang’s pipa and guzheng music world

[Chinese version]
Latest update: 12/2006

http://homepage.ntu.edu.tw/~gim/gia/index.html

Chen-Gia Tsai : Perception of Overtone Singing

Perception of Overtone Singing : Chen-Gia Tsai

Pitch strength

Voices of overtone-singing differ from normal voices in having a sharp formant Fk (k denotes Kh??mei), which elicits the melody pitch fk = nf0. For normal voices, the bandwidths of formants are always so large that the formants merely contribute to the perception of timbre. For overtone-singing voices, the sharp formant Fk can contribute to the perception of pitch.

A pitch model based on autocorrelation analysis predicts that the strength of fk increases as the bandwidth of Fk decreases. Fig. 1 compares the spectra and autocorrelation functions of three synthesized single-formant vowels with the same fundamental frequency f0 = 150 Hz and formant frequency 9f0. In the autocorrelation functions the height of the peak at 1/9f0, which represents the pitch strength of 9f0, increases as the the formant bandwidth decreases. Fig. 1 suggests that the pitch of fk is audible once the strongest harmonic is larger than the adjacent harmonics by 10 dB.

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Figure 1: Spectra (left) and autocorrelation functions (right) of three single-formant vowels. Stream segregation

Next to the bandwidth of Fk, the musical context also plays a role in the perception of fk. During a performance of overtone-singing, the low pitch of f0 is always held constant. When fk moves up and down, the pitch sensation of f0 may be suppressed by the preceding f0 and listeners become indifferent to it. On the contrary, if f0 and fk change simultaneously, listeners tend to hear the pitch contour of f0, while the stream of fk may be more difficult to trace.

The multi-pitch effect in overtone-singing highlights a limitation of auditory scene analysis, by which the components radiated by the same object should be grouped and perceived as a single entity. Stream segregation occurs in the quasi-periodic voices of overtone-singing through the segregation/grouping mechanism based on pitch. This may explain that overtone-singing always sounds extraordinary when we first hear it.

Perception of rapid fluctuations

Tuvans employ a range of vocalizations to imitate natural sounds. Such singing voices (e.g., Ezengileer and Borbannadir) are characterized by rapid spectral fluctuations, evoking the sensation of rhythm, timbre vibrato or trill.

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http://www.soundtransformations.co.uk/PerceptioofOvertoneSingingChenGiaTsai.htm