聲音瑜珈 Weekly Voice Yoga by Mark Van TONGEREN in TAIPEI, TAIWAN , every thursday from 6 to 27 February 2020

MARK VAN TONGEREN

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聲音瑜珈 Weekly Voice Yoga sessions

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Voice Yoga is an integral approach to body & movement, breath, sound & silence. It is taught weekly in Taipei by Mark van Tongeren.

In Voice Yoga’s dynamic group process, students go beyond their own habits and expectations. Often, something larger than ourselves emerges: a flow of hidden creative potential. We work with all kinds of sounds without meaning, without emphasizing a beautiful voice. They help us to get beyond common subject-object and mind-body dualities, and bring our unconscious selves and irrational emotions to the surface. The group process becomes a mirror for the self and allows us to ‘see’ ourselves more clearly, to hear what’s living deep inside.


INSTRUCTOR
Designed and taught by Mark van Tongeren, a Dutch sound explorer with a deep interest in the synergy of arts, sciences and contemplative traditions. Mark has 25+ years of experience in theatre, music and dance productions and holds a PhD from Leiden University’s Academy of Creative of Performing Arts.

CONTENT
Voice Yoga consists of exercises that give pride of place to the voice as a central, creative force in our lives. Human existence depends in important ways on our speaking, listening, sounding and singing abilities. The class promotes awareness of the many roles of the voice in our daily lives. It expands our creative vocabulary, without necessarily talking about music, the singing voice or any musical style. The point is not so much to learn any specific new technique: we play with the voice in a lot of different ways and listen with fresh ears to the hidden potential of our voices.

In Voice Yoga, sound, silence and resonance become a mirror for the self. The sounds produced by ourselves, allows us to ‘see’ ourselves more clearly, to hear what’s living deep inside us. In ever-growing cycles of creating and perceiving we learn about music and sound, about ourselves and about the environment.

We usually start with silence, breath and body movements to turn away from our busy mind into the body and to the sensations we actually experience. We let the voice come out of a natural breath flow. We listen to and follow its natural resonances. We do not try to sing in an artful way, but to experience how body-mind-voice are intimately connected, and how voice and resonance can serve as a bridge to overcome the dualistic notion of body <> mind.

From then on, all kinds of styles and genres of vocalising and musicking may happen, some structured, some wild, some giving insight in your voice, some therapeutic. Exercises are based on yoga, musical and theatrical techniques, vipassana meditation and our innate love to play like children.

The idea behind Voice Yoga is comparable to yoga and tai-chi: the effect of the exercises is gradual. We believe that only with repeated classes you can really learn to connect the energies of voice & sound with the whole of your body and mind. You slowly become more and more familiar with your voice and its powers; you will begin to hear and feel things you did not hear and feel before. That’s why we suggest you to sign up for four classes a time after your trial class.

In a Voice Yoga Review of 2014 you can read some more.
https://fusica.wordpress.com/2014/12/30/voice-yoga-2014-re-view/

FOR WHOM
For those seeking to enrich their voices, let off steam and unlock their hidden creative potential.
For singers and those who are afraid to sing.
For actors, musicians and other artists and professionals who work with sound.
Perhaps more than anyone else, people who want to experience and learn about the therapeutical effects of sound seem to benefit from Voice Yoga.

LANGUAGE
The class is slowly transitioning to a Mandarin class, as Mark improves his skills. Expect some English too (and don’t mind too much about the talking anyway – the sounds will speak to you).

PRICE
Every class lasts 2 hours. The price is 400 NT$ for a single class, and 1500 NT$ for four classes (375 NT$ per class). Student, 65+ and disadvantaged discount of 25% (300NT$/one class ; 1125 NT$/four classes).
You do not have to attend four classes in a row but like you to use up your credit in about two months, three months at most; we’ll just tick off your presence four times and then you can sign up again for four times.

HOW TO REGISTER
Feel free to join the Voice Yoga class any time. It is best to send a message on FB every time you want to come to the Voice Yoga Group, once you are a member (after your fist visit, usually).


You can also write to mark at fusica dot nl or send a text-message to 09 10 48 27 49.

PLACE
Canjune Training Centre
台北市復興南路二段151巷3號4樓
4th Floor, number 3 , Lane 151, Fuxing South Road, Section 2, (this is about 20 meters from the corner of FuXing South Road). Ring the bell, go up the stairs and take the elevator to 4F.
Nearest MRT: Technology Building (10 min. walk).

真正多聲帶~不可思議的泛音唱法 Truly Multi-Voice-Incredible Overtones

真正多聲帶~不可思議的泛音唱法 Truly Multi-Voice-Incredible Overtones

748 vues•15 sept. 2019 15 1 Partager Enregistrersmbigsun洪春景 20,3 k abonnés 週六(9/14)下午2:00~4:00 「聲音瑜珈」在音樂館,即興、泛音詠唱界的傳奇人物 ~Mark Van Tongeren (馬克·范·湯格鄰 ),帶著滿場的聽眾以自己的聲音, 初步親身體驗瑜珈修練。 歡迎一起來參與! 主講: Mark Van Tongeren馬克.范.湯格鄰,荷蘭籍聲音探索家。 對藝術、科學與耐人尋味的音樂傳統有深入的研究。 馬克在劇場、音樂、與舞蹈製作有25年的經歷,為荷蘭萊登大學表演藝術博士。

(Mark Van Tongeren), with his audience in the audience, to experience the yoga practice firsthand. Come and join us! Speaker
Deep research on art, science and intriguing music traditions. Mark has 25 years of experience in theatre, music, and dance production, and is a PhD in Performing Arts at Leiden University in the Netherlands.

Overtone Singing – Mark Van Tongeren

Overtone Singing – Mark Van Tongeren

28 601 vues•27 sept. 2013 339 4 Partager EnregistrerPulpOnline247 113 abonnés Mark Van Tongeren explains overtone singing, and gives a demonstration on the Shanghai metro – because why not?

Overtone Singing on a low C, overtones 6-16 by Mark Van Tongeren, 14.11.2019

Overtone Singing on a low C, overtones 6-16 by Mark Van Tongeren, 14.11.2019

83 vues•14 nov. 2019 5 0 Partager EnregistrerFusica 23 abonnés For more explorations of overtone singing and other vocal techniques, sound and music, subscribe to our channel!

真正多聲帶~不可思議的泛音唱法 Real multi-vocal band ~ incredible overtone singing

Real multi-vocal band ~ incredible overtone singing 真正多聲帶~不可思議的泛音唱法

500 vues•14 sept. 2019 13 1 Partager Enregistrersmbigsun洪春景 16,7 k abonnés 週六(9/14)下午2:00~4:00 「聲音瑜珈」在音樂館,即興、泛音詠唱界的傳奇人物 ~Mark Van Tongeren (馬克·范·湯格鄰 ),帶著滿場的聽眾以自己的聲音, 初步親身體驗瑜珈修練。 歡迎一起來參與! 主講: Mark Van Tongeren馬克.范.湯格鄰,荷蘭籍聲音探索家。 對藝術、科學與耐人尋味的音樂傳統有深入的研究。 馬克在劇場、音樂、與舞蹈製作有25年的經歷,為荷蘭萊登大學表演藝術博士。

MARK VAN TONGEREN: Catching up with Tran Quang Hai

MARK VAN TONGEREN: Catching up with Tran Quang Hai

Fusica © 2002 – 2019

Catching up with Tran Quang Hai

5th October 2019Overtone Singing, People, Publications, Throat Singing, Writings, 中文Bach Yen, dan moi, jew’s harp, mouthharp, Overtone Singing, Tran Quang Hai, Vietnamese music

The most prolific researcher in the field of overtone singing is a man with many faces. His name is Tran Quang Hai and you can call him (and all options are correct): Vietnamese or French; a professional musician or a professional musicologist; an instrumentalist or a singer; an improviser or a composer; a traditional, a popular or an experimental musician (all three will do); an expert in Vietnamese traditional musics and an astute chronicler of its year-to-year development in the past decades.* Tran Quang Hai has a new book out celebrating his 50 years of music research in many different areas. We recently met in Paris, where he shared some interesting facts about the Vietnamese Jew’s harp (dan moi) I did not know before. On the trip back to Amsterdam I read most of the articles in his book that I had not seen before, so more on that too. Before talking about our meeting, his book and the origin of the word dan moi (Jew’s harp), some historical background. Since Hai is Tran Quang Hai’s first name I will refer to him as Hai.

I learned of Hai’s work on overtone singing in the early 1990s. When I got to know him personally, I was astounded and (I will admit) a bit intimidated by his unbridled energy. He loves to share what he does, and he is in fact overflowing with enthusiasm: for overtone singing, for Vietnamese music, for playing the Jew’s harp and spoons, for ethnomusicology, for his constant travels as a performer and teacher. After my visits I was usually exhilirated (about all the new things I had learned or shared with him) and at the same time exhausted (feeling my life was a mess with no progress at all).

In fact, going to Paris has been almost synonymous with visiting Hai and his lovely wife Bach Yen (whose singing carreer goes way way back). And these visits became almost synonymous with absolutely great Vietnamese food. Bach Yen often spent hours and hours to buy fine ingredients like all kinds of fresh leaves, vegetables, seafood and meat and prepare them the Vietnamese way. We would have excellent diners, drank nice wine, as the couple made an annual ‘pilgrimage’ to different regions in France to stock up on boxes of quality wine to share with friends at home.

After moving to Taiwan, my encounters with Tran Quang Hai were scarce, and visits to both of them even more. In 2019, it has been around ten years since we last met in Paris. So I was delighted to see them again some weeks ago. Tran Quang Hai retired a decade ago from the ethnomusicology department at the Musée de L’Homme in Paris, but has remained an active performer and workshop leader for all these years. Bach Yen is a famous singer of popular songs and entertainment music, as well as a singer of many different genres of traditional music. Together they have given hundreds of concerts in Europe and elsewhere, and they continue to do so. Here is a photo of their appearance in Genoa, Italy, a week or so after I met them.

Late August, when I walked down the platform of Gare de Lyon, Hai and Bach Yen were waiting for me. Once again I was overwhelmed to be in their buzzing, energetic presence. The first thing they did, was to get out their cameras and make many photos together. Then we strolled to their car, and their warm hands and arms embraced my arms. I sometimes think of myself as someone who easily touches people, but this time I thought I am quite distant compared to them. It was really (excusez le mot) touching to stroll down the platform chatting and to be ‘wrapped’ by their tender hands and arms on both sides. Hai told me once about using his hands to heal people and showed me some methods. But it seems the couple just radiates warmth and energy naturally, even without using a special method.

For our Vietnamese food, this time we drove to a place called Pho Bida, pronounced Fo Beeyaa. Pho is the famous Vietnamese noodle soup, but what about Bida? It turns out to be derived from ‘billiard’, as the former location of this restaurant housed a popular billiard room as well. The place is not very spacious but we were early and could chose any seat. By the time we left lots of people waited outside. The food was great and loved by Vietnamese and non-Vietnamese alike: highly recommended! (Pho Bida Vietnam, 36 rue Nationale, 75013 Paris)

Tran Quang Hai’s New Book

When we sat down, Hai gave me his new book, a thick volume with many of his articles and listst of all his achievements, titles, appearances, etc. organized in a single volume. Some articles I have known for a long time. So I particularly enjoyed reading those things I did not know in detail.

First, an article about Vietnamese music and its historical background, very helpful for understanding the relationship to Chinese music and culture. It also covers many of the recent developments in Vietnamese music, making it in effect a kind of encyclopaedic entry into Vietnam and all its music. With this work Hai most clearly follows in the footsteps of his late father Tran Van Khe, also a well-known musician and musicologist.

“Tran Quang Hai. 50 Years of Research in Vietnamese Traditional Music and Overtone Singing.”

Second, an article that accompanied a double CD issued in France in 1997, dedicated to the absolutely fascinating world of mountain tribe musics in Vietnam. There is a dazzling array of types of instruments and ways of playing, and these liner notes give a good overview of this field.

If you are interested in overtone singing and still love printed matter, as I do myself, then this is a good way to get your (physical) hands on several key articles on this technique by Dr. Tran Quang Hai and understand the background of his research. (Note for academic readers: for research purposes it is better to consult online pdfs of the articles in their original format). Available here.

Tran Quang Hai and the Dan Moi

During our lunch I also learned where the common name of the Vietnamese brass Jew’s harp comes from. It is usually referred to as dan moi, which is a Vietnamese word (compare for example dan tranh/đàn tranh, the plucked zither, or the unique one-string zither dan bau/đàn bầu). However, the thin, finely crafted Jew’s harp, probably smaller than any other type of Jew’s harp, originates from the mountain tribes who live close to Yunnan in South China. The Hmong’s native language and culture has little to do with that of the dominant Viet or Kinh ethnic group, who are historically tied to China. When travelling in the mountains in North Vietnam (around Sapa), I encountered the Hmong people who play this instrument and managed to get one made locally by their craftsmen. They referred to it as gya, phonetically speaking, though in writing it is referred to as djam. A personal note from Tran Quang Hai shortly after publishing this post: the Hmong name of the Jew’s harp is ncas (pronounced ncha).

The djam I bought in Sapa from girls who played the instrument along the mountain road. (photo by the author).

So I asked Hai how the name dan moi came about. He explained: there is no Jew’s harp in the music of the ethnic Vietnamese. So when he learned about the traditions of the mountain people around 50 years ago, he had to make up a new name himself in order to accommodate the minorities’ instrument in the system and language of Vietnam. To use ‘dan’ (meaning ‘instrument’) was an obvious beginning point. Hai decided to add ‘moi’ for lips, to designate it is played between the lips. Most brass or metal Jew’s harps are held against the teeth, with the lamella vibrating between the teeth; the dan moi is held between the lips and vibrates there. In this sense it is more like a type of wooden or bamboo Jew’s harp, particularly the ones vibrated by a string attached to one side.

A Hmong girl playing the djam for me in 2003 (photo by the author).

The dan moi went on to become a very popular instrument around the world once non-Vietnamese musicians discovered them, at the turn of the millenium. Many people asked me for it when I brought them back in 2003. I remember giving one to Tuvan throat singer Sainkho around 2004. She immediately fell for its bright sound and expressive qualities, and asked for more several times after (and so did other people). At the same time, a German company saw the potential of this cheap instrument to reach a huge audience and set up (web)shop, calling it www.danmoi.com. It has a become a one-stop shop to buy all kinds of Jew’s harps. So dan moi, Hai’s new name for the djham, a minority instrument, and for Jew’s harps in general, now has become sort of a symbol of 21st century global Jew’s harp culture. And it seems to be growing year by year: here in Taiwan I have seen many new Jew’s harp enthusiasts taking the stages recently, often sporting a collection of world Jew’s harps, including, of course, the dan moi.

Here is a video where you see the movement of the dan moi lamella in slow motion, played by Hai’s student Dang Khai Nguyen.

https://youtu.be/K_hf_u_LrtM

Learn more about Tran Quang Hai

Hai is still actively teaching, find out where his next workshops are by going to his blog:

https://tranquanghaisworldthroatsinging.com

(the blog itself amounts to a ‘wikipedia’ of sorts for throat/overtone singing, where you will find a huge amount o copies of scientific and popular articles, videos, and indeed copies of wikipedia entries, as well as some original posts about Hai’s workshops and travels).

Go here to find more entries in English and in Vietnamese:

https://tranquanghai1944.com

https://tranvankhe-tranquanghai.com

Finally, back to some Asian flavour, but East-Asian instead of the South-East Asian of Hai’s origins. Here is a hilarious video from the time Hai was flown into Japan to demonstrate overtone/throat singing in a hypertheatrical popular entertainment program.

https://youtu.be/cKuT4fy84oA

https://youtu.be/cKuT4fy84oA
TRAN QUANG HAI on JAPANESE TELEVISION, part 2, December 26, 2012

* OK, for this one I have no way to tell if it is true, but Hai does mention in his new book (page  32) that he wrote “more than 500 articles in Vietnamese for 30 Vietnamese magazines in America, Europe, Asia and Australia.”

https://www.fusica.nl/catching-up-with-tran-quang-hai/?fbclid=IwAR3yFp4YQxtwbEMmfVJLc1JrgCuP_eiMTjTC0jjKOVDPz6cPCcvWoeUqzzQ

Cascadescan – Mark van Tongeren

Cascadescan – Mark van Tongeren

Published on Jun 21, 2019

Complete concert: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhiMa… Live concert in the Oosterkerk, Amsterdam, Sunday 15/VII/2018. Poduced by Fusica / http://www.fusica.nl Video and audio recording and editing: Casper Steketee

The Ouroboros Concert (Sinan Arat / Mark van Tongeren)

The Ouroboros Concert (Sinan Arat / Mark van Tongeren)

Published on Nov 2, 2018

Sinan Arat (ney, voice) and Mark van Tongeren (voice, overtone singing, Jew’s harp, sruti box, bendir) meet for the very time and look for overlaps in their repertoires. Registration of a live concert in the Oosterkerk, Amsterdam, Sunday 15/VII/2018. Produced by Fusica / http://www.fusica.nl Playlist: 00:00 Ekmelia/Yörel (Mark van Tongeren) 03:21 Segah Taksim (Modal Improvisation on ney) (Sinan Arat) 05:42 Bass Brass (Jew’s harp) (Mark van Tongeren) 08:59 Segah Hymn Bana seni gerek seni (Music: Anonymous Lyrics: Yunus Emre (1238 – 1320) (Sinan Arat) 13:19 Voice of Bendir (Mark van Tongeren) 18:00 Cascadescan (Mark van Tongeren) 21:45 Human Condition (vocal improvisation) (Sinan Arat & Mark van Tongeren) 25:25 You Am (voice and sruti box) Mark van Tongeren) 34:00 Muhayyer Kurdi Taksim ( Modal Improvisation) 38:50 Muhayyer Hymn Uyan ey gozlerim (music: Ali Ufki Bey) (Sinan Arat) 41:09 Variations on the Yakut Khomus (Siberian Jew’s harp) (Mark van Tongeren) 46:35 Unknown Territories (Overtone singing and ney) (Sinan Arat & Mark van Tongeren) 53:35 Ah nice bir Uyursun Uyanmaz Misin (music: anonymous; lyrics: Yunus Emre) (Sinan Arat & Mark van Tongeren 55:50 Huseyni Hymn “Severim Ben Seni” (music: Anonymous; lyrics: Yunus Emre) (Sinan Arat & Mark van Tongeren) Video and audio recording and editing: Casper Steketee Thanks to Nanny Roed Lauridsen and The Oosterkerk, Amsterdam and to Fons Elders, part of the ouroboros phenomenon, for title suggestions. Produced by Fusica http://www.fusica.nl

You Am (Mark van Tongeren, voice, overtone singing, shruti box).)

You Am (Mark van Tongeren, voice, overtone singing, shruti box).)

Published on Jun 20, 2019

Complete concert: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhiMa… Live concert in the Oosterkerk, Amsterdam, Sunday 15/VII/2018. Poduced by Fusica / http://www.fusica.nl Video and audio recording and editing: Casper Steketee

MARK VAN TONGEREN : CATCHING MY BREATH WITHOUT OXYGEN

MARK VAN TONGEREN

https://www.fusica.nl/catching-my-breath-without-oxygen/

Last week Ming-Hwa Yeh invited me to join her for a late-night performance on the roof of the Wellspring Spa hotel in Yilan. Because of our travels, we had no time to rehearse except for the day itself. It was to be an adaptation of several performances we had done in previous years. We used plastic before, so she brought large sheets of plastic again. And she asked me to spread out the plastic on the water with her, then swim under it and come up. I then was trapped in a space where no fresh air entered.

Breathing out enlarged the space around my head a bit. Breathing in pulled the plastic back. As soon as the plastic closed off my mouth that was it (or almost, sometimes): no more air.

This was a very fun way for me to use breathing techniques. I first developed those as a kid, when I swam almost every day, or even several times a day. Later I learnt more from overtone singing, which naturally lowers the frequency of your breathing and induces a more controlled breathing. And later again from yoga and finally pranayama.

In the last 10 years I discovered all the games I can do with my kids in the swimming pool. Like playing dead: I completely relax my body, face down into the water. They start to move me up to get my head out of the water (too heavy) or push down and stand on my back (easier). Either way I would often stay under water for a minute, if possible.

Ming-Hwa, on the contrary, cannot swim – she never learnt it. And yet she made herself look convincing in the water, as if she could swim! And she had no fear of the water even when I pulled her to swim underwater.

This in itself was a great experience, also for the audience, I was told (we repeat it next week: the only performance for the public). Then imagine that it is a sky-high swimmingpool with the Pacific Ocean and Turtle Island/Guishan (龜山島) as a backdrop.

https://www.fusica.nl/catching-my-breath-without-oxygen/

(Photo credit: Alvis Lai)

https://www.silksspring.com/tw/promotions

 

fusica.nl
Catching my breath without oxygen. 14th June 2019News, People,…

Catching my breath without oxygen.

中文請往下滑
A strange coincidence that my last post here was about breathing, too. Or maybe not, as breathing is such a central part of my work.
Last week choreographer Ming-Hwa Yeh (葉名樺) invited me to join her for a late-night performance on the roof of the Wellspring Spa hotel in Yilan. Because of our travels, we had no time to rehearse except for the day itself. It was to be an adaptation of several performances we had done in previous years. We used plastic before, so she brought large sheets of plastic again. And she asked me to spread out the plastic on the water with her, then swim under it and come up. I then was trapped in a space where no fresh air entered.
Breathing out enlarged the space around my head a bit. Breathing in pulled the plastic back. As soon as the plastic closed off my mouth that was it (or almost, sometimes): no more air.
 
This was a very fun way for me to use breathing techniques. I first developed those as a kid, when I swam almost every day, or even several times a day. Later I learnt more from overtone singing, which naturally lowers the frequency of your breathing and induces a more controlled breathing. And later again from yoga and finally pranayama.
 
In the last 10 years I discovered all the games I can do with my kids in the swimming pool. Like playing dead: I completely relax my body, face down into the water. They start to move me up to get my head out of the water (too heavy) or push down and stand on my back (easier). Either way I would often stay under water for a minute, if possible.
 
Ming-Hwa, on the contrary, cannot swim – she never learnt it. And yet she made herself look convincing in the water, as if she could swim. And she had no fear of the water even when I pulled her to swim underwater (maybe I was more scared than she was) .
This is an almost one-off performance: last week for the press, we repeat it next week for the public. What a great way to stay in a hotel with a sky-high swimmingpool and the Pacific Ocean with Turtle Island/Guishan (龜山島) as a backdrop.
 
(Photo credit: Alvis Lai)

Can I sing sygyt for one minute without taking a breath?