INTERNATIONAL SCIENTIFIC CENTRE “KHOOMEI”, KYZYL, TUVA

MISSION

  • Preservation and development of traditional culture of Tuvan throat singing khorekteer.
  • Organization of scientific research for revealing and study of throat singing of the peoples of Sayan-Altai Region and other parts of the world and their propaganda.
  • Creation of archives khorekteer recordings and their analysis.
  • Training and probation of young performers including foreign performers in the experimental laboratory of the center.
  • Participation in international music contests and organization of international symposia, seminars, conferences and festivals of Tuvan throat singing khorekteer.
  • Promotion of scientific-practical international contacts.
  • Social protection of performers.
http://www.khoomei.narod.ru/khorekteereng.html NEWS

01.05.2008

We are honored to invite you to participate in the 5th International Ethnomusicology Symposium “Khoomei (throat-singing) is a Cultural Phenomenon of the Peoples of Central Asia” to be held July 25-28, 2008 in Kyzyl, the capital of the Republic of Tuva.

The problems of the functioning and development of throat singing in the different regions will be discussed.
Within the framework of the Symposium the 5th International festival of throat singing with participation of the performers from Moscow, Republic of Altay, Republic of Khakasia, Republic of Buryatia, Republic of Kalmykia, Republic of Yakutia, Republic of Bashkortostan, Mongolia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Japan, USA, France, Holland, Austria, Turkey and Norway will be held.
The issues of musical ethnography on following directions will be discussed:
1. Comparative study of double-voiced throat-singing (Khoomei).
2. Genres of traditional music ( ritual music, epos, lyric poetry).
3. Musical instruments and instrumental music.
4. Traditional music and religious systems.
5. Issues of migration of musical phenomena. Interaction of nomadic and settled cultures. Musical folklore as a source of historic information on ethnogenesis of peoples of Central Asia.
In work of  the symposium scientists of khoomei studies, physicians-physiologists, scientist physicists, musicologists, scientists of folk arts, throat singing performers, also representatives philological, history sciences will take part. Their themes are closely connected with marked problems.
Registration fee is 300$ US. Different exhibitions, show of movies, trips to the countryside of Tyva are in the program.
The thesis of scientific papers should be no more than 2 A4 (1,5 interval) both in English and Russian languages should be sent not later than 1st April 2008 (Thesis received after the 1st of April will not be included in the final thesis publication).
We kindly ask you to include the best people’s khoomei performers into the list of your delegation (not more than 2 people) to participate in the concert of the traditional music.
Accommodation and travel expenses are paid by participants; food and cultural program are paid by organizing committee of the Symposium.
We look forward to your acceptance.
Organizing Committee: International Scientific Centre “Khoomei”
46,Shchetinkin-Kravchenko str .
Kyzyl, Republic of Tyva, Russia, 667000
tel: +7 (39422) 2-33-18 fax: +7 (39422) 3-38-97
mobile: +7 913 342-43-87
e-mail: kyrgys@yandex.ru

Robert Oliver Beahrs: Post-Soviet Tuvan Throat-Singing (Xöömei)and the Circulation of Nomadic Sensibility, Ph.D. Dissertation at University of California, Berkeley, USA, 2014

Post-Soviet Tuvan Throat-Singing (Xöömei)and the Circulation of Nomadic  Sensibility By Robert Oliver Beahrs

A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy inMusici n the Graduate Division of the University of California, Berkeley

Committee in charge: Professor Benjamin Brinner, Chair

Professor Bonnie Wade , Professor Alexei Yurchak, Professor Theodore Levin

Fall 2014

doc. post soviet tuvan khoomei

index

post soviet tuvan khoomei 2.jpg

 

Abstract

Post-Soviet TuvanThroat-Singing (Xöömei)and the C

 

irculation of NomadicSensibility byRobert Oliver Beahrs Doctor of Philosophy in MusicUniversity of California, Berkeley Professor Benjamin Brinner, Chair

Guttural singing practices in the Sayan-Altai region of south-central Siberia have been historically framed as possessing “nomadic” qualities linked with pastoral population groups indigenous to the region. As these singing practices were incorporated into a genre of national folk music for Tannu Tuva (1921-1944) and the Tuvan Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (1961-1991)—and then later reformulated as the center piece of an exotic genre of world music—xöömei throat-singing was shaped by contradictory attitudes towards its purportedly nomadiccharacteristics, which have been essentialized at various times, for multiple reasons, by local and global actors and interest groups.

In the post-Soviet era, xöömeizhi(master throat-singers) from the Tuva Republic (now part of Russia) express a revitalized nomadic sensibility through xöömei singing practices, which has come to operate both as an ideology and a disposition for Tuvan traditional music. Drawing on a selective use of history, cultural memory, and natural environments, post-Soviet xöömeizhi construct a nomadic sensibility that is embodied in music and sound-making activities, foregrounded in intercultural exchanges, and circulated as a social disposition.

To Mom, Dad,and Matt

In Memoriam Katherine Hagedorn (1961-2013) and Kongar-ool Ondar (1962-2013)

 

 

http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu/etd/ucb/text/Beahrs_berkeley_0028E_14611.pdf

 

 

Khoomei: The Overtone Singing Style of Tuva and Mongolia

Khoomei: The Overtone Singing Style of Tuva and Mongolia

This unique style of music, often referred to as “throat singing”, is a central element of both Mongolian and Tuvan culture.

 

 

 

Origins of Khoomei

Khoomei is practiced primarily in Tuva and many parts of Mongolia. Tuva is a small republic within the Russian Federation, and is located in southeastern Siberia on the Northwestern border of Mongolia. The Mountains regions and the massive Mongolian Steppe provides an acoustic environment uniquely suited for the overtone singing style.

 

Scholars are not certain as to exactly when Khoomei was developed, but the style has been around for multiple centuries and it a central element to both Tuvan and Mongolian culture.

The Sounds of the Mountains and the Steppe

Ethnomusicologists strongly believe that the development of Khoomei in Mongolia and Tuva was largely affected by the regions unique geography. Around 80% of Tuva, located in southeastern Siberia, is made up of Mountains while Mongolia is a unique combination of Steppe (grasslands) and large mountain ranges.

 

Throat singers in Mongolia and Tuva work to mimic the sounds of nature and combine them with human sounds in order to promote a sense of harmony between the two. Khoomei is the outward expression of these cultures’ reverence for their natural surroundings. The deep undertone heard in the music of any practitioner of Khoomei is meant to reverberate and carry over long distances in these awe-inspiring landscapes.

Styles of Khoomei: Sygyt

One of the three basic styles of Khoomei is called Sygyt. This style is the highest pitched of all the styles. In this style, the singer creates whistle tones with the throat in order to mimic the birds and the natural sounds found in the mountains and in the Steppe.

Styles of Khoomei: Kargyraa

Kargyraa is different from Sygyt  standard Khoomei because it focuses on extremely low pitches, with the sound being a full octave lower than the initial bass tone. This style is meant meant to mimic the deep “roar of waterfalls” and the “croaking” of a cow. This style sounds more grounded than other styles because of how low it is in the voice.

The Igil

The Igil a two-stringed instrument strummed with a bow and it is often used to accompany throat singers. The instrument, like the singer, also mimics nature. The steady strumming of the Igil is meant to mimic the sounds of a horse. Riding on horseback is a major element of Tuvan and, especially, of Mongol culture.

 

 

 

Kongar ol-Ondar

Kongar ol-Ondar, known as the “People’s Throat Singer of Tuva”, is the most famous figure of Throat Singing in the West. Ondar collaborated with American musical artists such as Willie Nelson and Randy Scruggs. Ondar also appeared on Late Night with David Letterman in 1999 (shown here). With a number of albums including Echoes of Tuva and the cleverly titled Back Tuva Future: The Adventure Continues, Ondar spread his work throughout the West.

 

Ondar became such an integral cultural figure in Tuva that the government paid him a living wage to continue his work as a musician. Ondar played until he passed away in 2013 after complications following a brain hemorrhage. He was 51 years old.

 

Women Throat Singers

Typically, Khoomei is performed by men. This trend is linked to the widespread belief throughout Tuvan and Mongolian culture that Throat Singing poses great heath risks for women. Many believe that the practice can cause a woman to become infertile.

 

In recent years, however, more women have begun to pursue Khoomei. Famous female throat singers include Choldak Kara-Oyun and Shonchalai Oojak-Choodu among others.

Khoomei in Pop Culture

Khoomei has begun to make more subtle, but noticeable, appearances in pop culture. The Netflix Series Marco Polo, which is about the famous explorer’s interactions with the Mongol Empire, features throat singing tracks in its intro soundtrack. Also, in the last episode of the first season, the main characters gather around a campfire and throat sing before battle.

 

Khoomei and Mongolian Pop Music

Current Mongolian musical artists often incorporate throat singing into their work, often blending Khoomei with Rap, Hip-Hop and Techno music. Musicians like Ethnic Zorigoo (shown here), blend Western music styles with Khoomei 

 

Khoomei: Geography’s Influence on Art

The development of Khoomei provides an ideal example of how geography affects all aspects of culture, including music. The mimicry of natural sounds and the sense of awe-inspiring wonder found within Khoomei provides the listener with a unique look into the fascinating cultures of both the Tuvans and the Mongolians.

 

Just as art reflects life, the incredible sounds produced by Throat Singers reflects the majesty of the the Altai Mountains and vast expanse of the Eurasian steppe. Throat Singers provide harmony between human made sounds and those of nature; this art form is the ultimate expression gratitude and appreciation of one’s environment.

https://www.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=b678c85d18c34b8b8801e6246823ad7c

Alash – Alash Album (Full)

Alash – Alash Album (Full)

Ajoutée le 9 août 2017

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/semih.ipek/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/semih.ipek.547 Twitter: https://twitter.com/semih0209Alahs (2007) Bady-Dorzhu Ondar – Vocals, igil, guitar, bayan Ayan-ool Sam – Vocals, doshpuluur, igil Mai-ool Sedip – Vocals, byzaanchy, limpi Ayan Shirizhik – Vocals, kengirge, shyngyrash, murgu, igil Alash
Track List (16 tracks)
1. Alash (00:00)
2. Bashtak-la Deesh Meni Kanchaar? (I’m a Joker) (03:04)
3. Manchürek (05:11)
4. Karachal (07:48)
5. Ezengileer (10:26)
6. Oitulaash Xeveri (12:09)
7. Daam Dözü (16:45)
8. Sygyt Yrym Salyp Berein (21:41)
9. Bady’s Solo (24:31)
10. Ene-Sai (27:55)
11. Borbangnadyr (32:15)
12. Dyngyldai (34:11)
13. Chaghatai (36:33)
14. Chavydak (40:54)
15. Dekei-oo and Saiyzyral (42:22)
16. Subudai (44:16)

Alash – Buura (Full Album)

Alash – Buura (Full Album)

Ajoutée le 9 oct. 2017

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/semih.ipek/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/semih.ipek.547 Twitter: https://twitter.com/semih0209 Buura (2011) Nachyn Choodu Bady-Dorzhu Ondar Ayan-ool Sam Ayan Shirizhik Victor Wooten (guest artist)
Complete Track List 1. Yrlaazhyyly (Let’s Sing) [0:00]
2. My Throat, the Ediski [04:24]
3. Ediskileer Angchy-la Men (solo by Nachyn Choodu) [07:24]
4. Ondar Girls [10:04]
5. Xomustar [13:58]
6. Xöngnüm Bile Salyp Berein (solo by Bady-Dorzhu Ondar) [17:51]
7. Tractor Drivin’ Woman [25:10]
8. Kosh-oi and Torgalyg [29:31]
9. Sygyt in the style of Maxim Dakpai (solo by Ayan-ool Sam) [35:16]
10. Bai-Taiga [38:40]
11. The Reindeer Herder’s Song [47:21]
12. Murgu Solo by Ayan Shirizhik [51:46]
13. Buura (with guest artist Victor Wooten) [54:14]

Alash Demonstrates Throat Singing Styles

Alash Demonstrates Throat Singing Styles

Ajoutée le 1 sept. 2017

Alash’s Achai is available from the Smithsonian Folkways website: http://folkways.si.edu/alash/achai Tuvan ensemble Alash demonstrates various traditional throat singing styles that they use in their music. About Achai: Achai, the Tuvan word for father, describes a deep paternal participation in the upbringing and growth of a new generation. It is also a fitting title for Alash’s new album to honor Kongar-ool Ondar, who served not only as a musical father for the ensemble, but also for an entire generation of Tuvan musicians. As Ondar shared memory and tradition, so too does Alash with spirited performances and forward-thinking collaborations. In the group’s first studio album for Smithsonian Folkways, Achai beautifully illustrates the adaptability of Tuvan music—organically created and deeply rooted, yet still interconnected with the sound world of the 21st century. Featuring master beatboxer Shodekeh, alongside time-honored Tuvan throat-singing styles, the album demonstrates how members of Alash have dedicated their lives to performing, preserving, developing, and growing the Tuvan tradition. They are worthy bearers of the culture of their fathers and sons. 57 minutes, 24-page booklet.

Robert Oliver Beahrs: Post-Soviet Tuvan Throat-Singing (Xöömei)and the Circulation of Nomadic Sensibility, University of California Berkeley, 2014

Post-Soviet Tuvan Throat-Singing (Xöömei)and the Circulation of Nomadic Sensibility

By Robert Oliver Beahrs

A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of therequirementsfor the degree of Doctor of Philosophy inMusic in the Graduate Division of the University of California, Berkeley

Committee in charge:Professor Benjamin Brinner, Chair ,Professor Bonnie Wade, Professor Alexei Yurchak, Professor Theodore Levin

Fall 2014

http://digitalassets.lib.berkeley.edu/etd/ucb/text/Beahrs_berkeley_0028E_14611.pdf

 

Abstract : Post-Soviet TuvanThroat-Singing (Xöömei)and the Circulation of NomadicSensibility

byRobert Oliver Beahrs Doctor of Philosophy in Music University of California, Berkeley

Professor Benjamin Brinner, Chair ,

Guttural singing practices in the Sayan-Altai region of south-central Siberia have been historically framed as possessing “nomadic” qualities linked with pastoral population groups indigenous to the region. As these singing practices were incorporated into a genre of national folk music for TannuTuva (1921-1944) and the Tuvan Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (1961-1991)—and then later reformulated as the centerpiece of an exotic genre of world music—xöömei throat-singing was shaped by contradictory attitudes towards its purportedly nomadic characteristics, which have been essentialized at various times, for multiple reasons, by local and global actors and interest groups. In the post-Soviet era, xöömeizhi(master throat-singers) from the Tuva Republic (now part of Russia) express a revitalized nomadic sensibility through xöömei singing practices, which has come to operate both as an ideology and a disposition for Tuvan traditional music. Drawing on a selective use of history, cultural memory, and natural environments, post-Soviet xöömeizhi construct a nomadic sensibility that is embodied in music and sound-making activities, foregrounded in intercultural exchanges, and circulated as a social disposition.