Full Album The Me Machine by Alexander Glenfield

Full Album The Me Machine by Alexander Glenfield

Ajoutée le 22 août 2018

THE ME MACHINE Alexander Glenfield 1) Late Bloomer 2) Changing Same 3) In Between 4) Already Mine 5) Moon Man 6) The Me Machine 7) Beautiful Game 8) Wild Enough Animal 9) Always the End of the World 10) Don’t Try Now 11) Story of Us Photography by Brenda Spielmann

 

Alex Glenfield, Overtone Singing, Throat Singing, “Changing Same”

Alex Glenfield, Overtone Singing, Throat Singing, “Changing Same”

Ajoutée le 10 août 2014

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the… https://play.spotify.com/artist/4WUdp… Here is another piece of something I made. I have these pieces all over the place, and sometimes they go together nicely. Yes, I still do Skype lessons and give you all you need to know and do. Watch (or skip) to the end of the video for my email address. CHANGING SAME (lyrics) So you’re afraid of the signs of change Never clear enough to tell The shadow of the spider Is so much bigger than the spider herself To blame again and again For this sloppy reincarnation But maybe karma’s just a system device To keep you from complaining Changing same Changing same Spin around the wheel of fortune The fate of each to fall Into changes strangely given Have to walk before you crawl Stay the same the sleeper slumbers On and on til death Let the changing ever present Find me on your breath

Tuvan Throat Singing Basics with Jerry Walsh

Tuvan Throat Singing Basics with Jerry Walsh

Ajoutée le 1 févr. 2016

This video is an introduction to the three fundamental styles of Tuvan throat singing: Kargyraa, Khoomei, and Sygyt. Examples and demonstration of techniques are provided. Xorekteer (Throat singing from the chest) Generate a small bubbling sensation in your larynx by gently toning the phrase “Ahhh” and feel where the bubbling is strongest. This bubbling is created by your vocal cords/folds moving in your larynx. This is the region the throat that needs to be constricted. Now, sing the phrase “Ahhh” and squeeze the region of the throat (the larynx) that was creating the bubbling sound in the previous exercise. When you squeeze the larynx while simultaneously singing, it creates the xorekteer voice. Khoomei Generate the Xorekteer voice. Now, bring the lips and mouth into the shape of a small circular opening to create a chamber for the sound to resonate in. This proper reshaping of the mouth creates the Khoomei style. Sygyt While still practicing Khoomei, you can now bring the tongue to the top of the jaw, filtering the sound out through a small opening wherever you feel comfortable, creating the high whistle of Sygyt. Kargyraa Begin with the mouth closed for back pressure. Begin by clearing the throat with a squeeze of the larynx. Almost like making the tone “Hmmm”. When you feel the vibration of the throat coming on, open the mouth and experiment with different vowel sounds. *Photo of Kongar-ol Ondar by Bill Loewy courtesy Wikimedia Commons Email me at “jerry” at “didgeproject.com” for private lessons and questions.

Steve Sklar and Nikolai Oorzhak Throat-Singing

Steve Sklar and Nikolai Oorzhak Throat-Singing

Published on Jul 24, 2007

Nikolai and Steve singing kargyraa and sygyt for children in a huge glacial pothole, Taylor Falls, MN 2002 Get better quality videos, mp3s, online throat-singing lessons, throat-and-overtone singing forum and lots more at http://khoomei.com

Throat-Singing and Tuvan igil, Steve Sklar and John Pascuzzi

Throat-Singing and Tuvan igil, Steve Sklar and John Pascuzzi

Published on Aug 3, 2008

John Pascuzzi is playing the “igil”, and Steve Sklar is Throat-Singing. From an upcoming DVD and CD by Ron Mulvihill and Gris-Gris Films.

Three Rare Styles of Overtone Singing (Throat Singing)

Three Rare Styles of Overtone Singing (Throat Singing)

Published on Jul 19, 2010

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the… https://play.spotify.com/artist/4WUdp… Now offering SKYPE lessons to the world! Email or message to inquire. In one session, learn all you need to know to start your own overtone-singing practice! The demonstration of ezengileer on “Seven Styles of Overtone Singing” is a less pure example of the traditional style than the one heard here. But as we all know, tradition is notoriously impure. Tradition is as about as pure as the air we breathe.