SoRIAH with Ashkelon Sain: Eztica

SoRIAH with Ashkelon Sain: Eztica

438 9 Partager EnregistrerAtlan09 201 abonnés Music Video for the song “Eztica”; From the Projekt Records release of the same name by SoRIAH with AshkelonSain. Filmed at Kalaloch Beach, Olympic Peninsula, WA. Cast features Soriah, Ashkelon, Kathryn Joy & Lucretia*Renee. (c2011)

Soriah Tuvan Throat Singer

Soriah Tuvan Throat Singer

1,1 k 17 Partager EnregistrerDiggable Monkey Video Productions 628 abonnés Soriah, which translates as “Milky Way” from Sufi, is the stage persona for the internationally recognized artist, Enrique Ugalde. Soriah’s craft is a blending of traditional Khöömei (Tuvan Throat Singing), tempered with Soriah’s own visceral force. Performances vary from being steeped in tradition and bound to its constructs to more experimental fascinations with electronic and acoustic accompaniments, and introducing Butoh and Ritual Performance Art. Soriah’s use of Khöömei as a transportive medium is an offering to nature in her own tongue, that of organic sound whether it be wind, water or the mimicry of animals. He is currently working to integrate his work into film and sound design. Soriah takes an annual sabbatical to Tuva to study with various masters and to compete. The 2008 Fifth Quinquennial Ethnomusicology Symposium, “Khöömei: The Cultural Phenomenon of Central Asia”, has honored Enrique Ugalde, “Third Place”, the highest a non-native to Tuva has yet placed. The Üstüü-Khüree Festival awarded him “Best Foreigner” for their 2008 selection. In 2014, he won 2nd place in the Tuvan National Kargyraa Competition. The rest of the year Soriah travels the globe with extended tours performing in various cities and enclaves of Japan, crooning in the cathedrals and ruins of Mexico, and intoning in ocean caves and amidst the swamplands of America. The artist has been invited to perform at society events such as The 2009 Peace Ball in Washington, D.C. for Obama’s inauguration, and by brigand artist elites, to sing at various installations of note at the Burning Man Festival. One becomes encased in an awe-laced ceremonial pallor while in attendance at a Soriah performance. A deep spiritualism imbues each piece performed, whether entirely traditional or exhibiting a fusion of music, movement and meditation that Soriah describes as Vocalized Ritual Drone. ++++++++++++++++++++++ Video by Diggable Monkey Productions Produced by Kevin Balmer http://diggablemonkey.comhttps://plus.google.com/b/10469322067… Music Video for the song “Ehecatl”; The first in a series of videos from the Projekt Records CD “Eztica”, by Soriah with Ashkelon Sain. Music Video for the song “Eztica”; From the Projekt Records release of the same name by SoRIAH with AshkelonSain. Filmed at Kalaloch Beach, Olympic Peninsula, WA. Cast features Soriah, Ashkelon, Kathryn Joy & Lucretia*Renee. (c2011) Video – Soriah Live at the WGT in Leipzig 2013 by Stan Barthez Soriah End Photo by Libby Bulloff (2011)

Enrique Ugalde Kargyraa at the Khöömei in the Center of Asia Festival 2019

Enrique Ugalde Kargyraa at the Khöömei in the Center of Asia Festival 2019

Enrique Ugalde’s Kargyraa at the Gala concert of the Khöömei in the center of Asia Festival, August 18, 2019

ХООМЕЙ БИТ – ХОВУ ЧЕРГЕ (KHOOMEI BEAT – WANDERING THE STEPPE…) (OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO)

ХООМЕЙ БИТ – ХОВУ ЧЕРГЕ (KHOOMEI BEAT – WANDERING THE STEPPE…) (OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO)

Ajoutée le 1 janv. 2019

“WANDERING THE STEPPE…” A place where time flows differently. Production: OVAA MEDIA Director: Eres Mongush Cameraman: Vladimir Mongush VFX: Demchik Kuular Location: IYME Republic of Tuva Special thanks: Temir Salchak,Ishkin ogly, to the organizers of the exhibition “DIGITAL ART”.

How to sing overtones (tutorial)

How to sing overtones (tutorial)

Ajoutée le 6 oct. 2015

Short tutorial on how to sing and control overtones. Leave a comment and give me your thoughts! Check out Czorgaard here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC4Kl… View my F#1 tutorial: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-HvbB…

JOLENE CREIGHTON : Overtone Singing: The Science Behind Singing Multiple Notes At Once (VIDEO)

FromQuarkstoQuasars

Overtone Singing: The Science Behind Singing Multiple Notes At Once (VIDEO)

Jolene CreightonOctober 7th 2014
Image credit: Pinoy
Image credit: Pinoy

This video has been making the rounds recently. It’s a neat little example of a thing called “overtone singing,” which is also known as “throat singing.” When you first hear it, it may seem like it must be a talent that is only granted to a rare few, but it is actually a technique that nearly anyone can learn. As singer Anne-Maria Hefele states, “overtone singing is a voice technique where one person sings two notes at the same time.” This is accomplished by manipulating the placement of your tongue and the shape of your mouth. Such manipulation produces a low note and a high note.

The low note is known as the “fundamental, ” and it is the usual tone of the voice (when preforming overtone singing, this low note sounds like a sustained drone or a Scottish bagpipe). The high note sounds like a resonating whistle.

At first glance, overtone singing might not seem like it involves any physics, but it’s actually firmly linked to this Science (at least in the Western world). Piero Cosi, senior researchers at the Institute of Cognitive Science and Technologies, states that overtone singing made its way to the West thanks to an American physicist known as Richard Feynman (one of the father’s of quantum mechanics). When tracing its history, Cosi asserts that, “Throat-Singing has almost entirely been an unknown form of art until rumours about Tuva [which is a is a federal subject of Russia] and the peculiar Tuvan musical culture spread in the West, especially in North America, thanks to Richard Feynman, a distinguished American physicist, who was an ardent devotee of Tuvan matters.”

According to William R. Corllis, many birds can also produce simultaneously two tones that are not harmonically related. Notably, these birds have a special double-barreled organ, which is called the “syrinx,” that enables them to preform this feat. In humans, the process works a little differently. Jim Cole, over at Spectral Voices, notes that, for overtone singing, performers start by following these simple guidelines:

To begin singing high whistle-like overtones, the sides of the tongue are curved upward and held nearly against the upper premolar teeth – creating a seal with the roof of the mouth all the way around (with a small opening for air to pass).  To try this yourself, sing “errrr”  For higher overtones, move the tongue forward. Vowel sounds and lip shapes are important in fine-tuning the harmonics.  The lowest harmonics are emphasized with tight “oo” sounds, while increasingly higher harmonics can be heard as vowels change through “oh…awe…ah…ay…ee,” and everything in between.

Cosi breaks down the science, “the tongue is raised so to divide the vocal tract in two main resonators, each one tuned on a particular resonance. By an appropriate control, we can obtain to tune two separate harmonics, and thereby to make perceptible, not one but two (or more) pitches at the same time.” In the below video, Hefele demonstrates how to do this, and what it should sound like when you are doing it correctly. Of course, it should be noted that Hefele has been training for years (she has been studying the technique since 2005), so you shouldn’t expect results like this any time soon. (The most amazing parts occur around 3:25).

WATCH: Overtone Singing—Singing Multiple Notes At Once