Inside Steve Sklar’s Larynx: Sygyt, University of Visconsin, 1998

Inside Steve Sklar’s Larynx: Sygyt, University of Visconsin, 1998

Ajoutée le 24 juil. 2007

Endoscopic video examination of my larynx while singing Tuvan sygyt style. Things to notice: the extreme constriction of the vestibule of the larynx; compare this to the more open area around and at the vocal folds when I stop singing, and when I speak in normal voice. You can barely see the vocal folds when singing sygyt (they look almost like tiny teeth beneath the constriction). Also, note the movement of the epiglottis (looks like a bright surfboard) with the harmonic melody. This is done by appropriate movements of the root of the tongue, to which it is connected. Ever wonder how videos of the inside of the larynx are made? See this video about fibroscopy, used to make endoscopic videos: http://khoomei.com/videos/fibroscopy.mov Kids, don’t try this at home!!! Get better quality videos, mp3s, online throat-singing lessons, throat-and-overtone singing forum and lots more at http://khoomei.com

Inside Steve Sklar’s Larynx: Kargyraa, University of Visconsin ,1998

Inside Steve Sklar’s Larynx: Kargyraa, University of Visconsin ,1998

Ajoutée le 24 juil. 2007

Endoscopic video examination of my larynx while singing Tuvan kargyraa style. Things to notice: the constriction of the vestibule of the larynx; compare this to the more open area around and at the vocal folds when I stop singing, and when I speak in normal voice. Also, you can see the two levels of kargyraa phonation: at the level of the vocal folds (lower, and partially occluded, and the ventricular folds, which are vibrating ABOVE the vocal folds. The ventricular folds are the source of the low tones, NOT something low in the neck as claimed by others here at YouTube. Ever wonder how videos of the inside of the larynx are made? See this video about fibroscopy, used to make endoscopic videos: http://khoomei.com/videos/fibroscopy.mov Kids, don’t try this at home!!! Get better quality videos, mp3s, online throat-singing lessons, throat-and-overtone singing forum and lots more at http://khoomei.com

 

Sehnsucht nach dem Frühlinge (Mozart) – Anna-Maria Hefele

Sehnsucht nach dem Frühlinge (Mozart) – Anna-Maria Hefele

Ajoutée le 26 avr. 2017

MRT- Aufnahmen: Prof. Dr. med. Bernhard Richter & Dr.-Ing. Michael Burdumy http://www.mh-freiburg.de/fim Anna-Maria Hefele: Gesang, Obertongesang, Harfe | http://www.anna-maria-hefele.com/ Thomas Radlwimmer: Video | http://www.radlwimmer.at/ Musik: “Sehnsucht nach dem Frühlinge” von Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
What you see in this dynamic MRI-recording is the tongue movement in the vocal tract while doing overtone singing and normal singing. The positions of the tongue forms the resoncance cavities which delete all not-wanted overtones in the sound of the voice at a certain point in time, and then amplify a single overtone that is left, which can be heard as a seperate note above the fundamental.
The MRI recordings were made by Prof. Dr. Bernhard Richter, Prof. Dr. Matthias Echternach and Dr.- Ing. Michael Burdumy in the University Medical Center Freiburg, Institute for Musician’s Medicine. http://www.mh-freiburg.de/fim – thank you so much for the kind permission to use the MRI-footage in order to share this fascinating singing-insight with the world!
The team of doctors in Freiburg developed a highly specialized equipment for recording and and also filtering sound in the MRI-machine.
This recording is made while using a pre-produced playback on headphones in the really loud MRI-machine while lying on the back. A lot of more of very interesting MRI- and endoscopy- recordings of various singers and vocalists (classical singers, overtone singers, yodellers, beatboxers….) will be published on a DVD about end of April 2017 @ Helbling. TITLE: “Die Stimme: Einblicke in die physiologischen Vorgänge biem Singen und Sprechen” ENGLISH: “The Voice: Physiological Insights in Singing and Speaking” If you want to get INFORMED ABOUT THE RELEASE of this extraordinary DVD please SIGN UP to this mailing list: http://eepurl.com/cAYDyj in order to keep UPDATED about my activities please like my FB-page: https://www.facebook.com/amoberton and sign up for my NEWSLETTER here: http://bit.ly/1TdxQty This video is under copyright. Please feel free to repost and embedd the video while using its original YouTube-Link: https://youtu.be/d6cyHGOht58. No download & re-uploading on other websites, social networks or channels. If you want to get a license for the video or parts of it please contact me (via http://anna-maria-hefele.com/contact….) AND the copyright owners of the MRI-footage at the Institute for Musicians Medicine Freiburg (http://www.mh-freiburg.de/fim). Thanks for showing respect to the creative artist of your choice!!!

Look inside the head of a opera singer as he performs Wagner Live As He Performs

Look inside the head of a opera singer as he performs Wagner Live As He

Ajoutée le 8 mai 2016

Look inside the head of a opera singer as he performs Wagner Live As He Performs An opera singer’s talent could be said to have gone to his head. German baritone Michael Volle performed a piece by Wagner in an MRI scanner to reveal the inner workings of his head and throat. The technique, which uses magnetic fields and radio waves to peer into the body, has captured the mechanics of singing and could help experts solve the mysteries of how singers belt out tunes. German baritone Michael Volle performed a piece by Wagner in an MRI scanner (pictured) to reveal the inner workings of his head and throat. The technique, which uses magnetic fields and radio waves to peer into the body, has captured the mechanics of singing and could help experts learn how singers belt out tunes inside,head,opera singer suscribe us

The Vocal Tract – Vocal Resonance.

The Vocal Tract – Vocal Resonance.

Ajoutée le 22 mai 2018

Johan Sundberg – “Vocal Tract resonance in singing”.
Manuel Garcia – “Hints on Singing”,1894. pgs 12-13.
Douglas Stanley – “Your Voice” “Applied science and vocal art. Singing and speaking” . 1945. pg 61
William Vennard – “Singing the mechanism and the technic” 1967. pg 82, paragraph 297.